Toronto researcher to receive 'Nobel of neuroscience' prize

TORONTO -- A Toronto-based researcher is among three scientists receiving the world's most valuable prize for brain research in recognition of their work on the mechanisms of memory.

See Full Article

Graham Collingridge, a neuroscientist at Mount Sinai Hospital, shares the one-million euro Brain Prize with Tim Bliss, a visiting researcher at the Francis Crick Institute in London, and Richard Morris of the University of Edinburgh.

The Brain Prize, widely regarded as the "Nobel Prize for neuroscientists," is awarded each year by the Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Foundation in Denmark to one or more scientists who have distinguished themselves through outstanding contributions to the field of brain research.

Collingridge's focus is on the brain mechanism known as "long-term potentiation" (LTP), which underpins the life-long plasticity of the brain. His work, along with that of Bliss and Morris, has revolutionized the approach to understanding how memories are formed, retained and lost.

The British-born scientist's discoveries are particularly important in efforts to treat diseases such as Alzheimer's, in which the efficiency of brain synapses is altered. His work has contributed to a medication that temporarily slows down the progression of the disease.

"I am delighted to share this award," Collingridge said in a statement Tuesday. "Working on the cellular mechanisms of learning and memory has been both richly challenging and intensely rewarding for me. I am really excited about now translating discoveries about LTP into new treatments for dementia."

Collingridge, a senior investigator at Mount Sinai's Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, came to Toronto last year from Bristol, England, where he is also a professor of neuroscience in anatomy at the University of Bristol.

"Memory is at the heart of human experience," Sir Colin Blakemore, chairman of the Brain Prize selection committee, said in a release from the Grete Lundbeck foundation. "This year's winners, through their ground-breaking research, have transformed our understanding of memory and learning, and the devastating effects of failing memory."

Bliss, who earned his doctorate at McGill University in Montreal, is recognized internationally for his seminal research on the neural foundation of learning and memory. In 1973, he and Oslo researcher Terje Lomo co-authored a paper on LTP, the most widely-studied experimental model of how the brain stores memories.

In 1986, Richard Morris used a new method he had developed to show that LTP was necessary for laboratory rats and mice to learn to find their way around a new environment. He developed the Morris water navigation task, a water maze widely used by scientists to study spatial learning and memory in rodents.

The Brain Prize will be presented to the three neuroscientists by Crown Prince Frederik of Denmark at a ceremony July 1 in Copenhagen.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Maple syrup producers blame climate change for production drop

    Tech & Science CTV News
    DURHAM, N.H. -- New Hampshire's maple syrup producers say they are feeling the impact of climate change, as winters become warmer and frigid nights so critical to their business become fewer. Producers joined climate experts and Democratic U.S. Source
  • Roblox: Child protection agency warns parents after reports of lewd chats on game

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TORONTO -- The Canadian Centre for Child Protection is warning parents following reports of sexually suggestive messages being sent through the popular Roblox children's gaming environment. Roblox is a user-generated gaming environment where children are encouraged to create adventures using their avatar, play games and connect with friends in a multiplayer environment that claims to more than 44 million active users. Source
  • Selfie paradox: People want fewer selfies on social media but keep posting selfies themselves

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Approximately one in every three photos taken these days is a selfie. Google estimates Android users take 93 million selfies a day. But despite their popularity, new research suggests most people wish there were fewer selfies online. Source
  • Canada's grasslands: 'most endangered, least protected ecosystems'

    Tech & Science CBC News
    more stories from this episodeHow two friends fought to be legal 'co-mommas' to a 7-year-old boy — and wonCanada's grasslands: 'most endangered, least protected ecosystems'Anti-Islamophobia motion could stifle free speech, say criticsFull Episode Source
  • New-gen HoloLens virtual reality headset could be coming in 2019

    Tech & Science CTV News
    While Microsoft's first HoloLens virtual reality headset has been available to buy since last year the U.S. tech giant could now be working on a more advanced second-generation version that's more geared up for the consumer market, according to specialist website Thurrott. Source
  • 'Just delete it': Mother's app warning after witnessing lewd act on son's phone

    Tech & Science CTV News
    A Quebec mother is warning other parents about the potential dangers of a popular video chat app called live.ly. Samantha Theoret told CTV Montreal that she witnessed an adult male performing a sexual act in a chat room on the app on her 10-year-old son’s phone on Friday night. Source
  • D.C. panda fans bam-boo-hoo as U.S.-born cub leaves for China

    Tech & Science CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- The National Zoo in Washington is saying a final goodbye to its panda cub Bao Bao. The zoo is packing up the American-born panda for a one-way flight Tuesday to China, where the 3-year-old will eventually join a panda breeding program. Source
  • Panda express: Bao Bao on nonstop flight to China

    Tech & Science CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- The National Zoo in Washington has said its final goodbye to its panda cub Bao Bao. The zoo packed up the American-born panda Tuesday for a one-way flight to Chengdu, China, where the 3-year-old will eventually join a panda breeding program. Source
  • 'Cosmic shoutout' for Thunder Bay; asteroid now bears name of Ontario city

    Tech & Science CBC News
    The city of Thunder Bay, Ont., is getting a "cosmic shoutout" from the International Astronomical Union, which has accepted a proposal to name an asteroid after the city. "It's tremendously exciting", said Maureen Nadin, the chair of the exoplanet naming committee for the Thunder Bay Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. Source
  • NASA aims to measure vital snow data from satellites

    Tech & Science CTV News
    DENVER -- Instrument-laden aircraft are surveying the Colorado high country this month as scientists search for better ways to measure how much water is locked up in the world's mountain snows -- water that sustains a substantial share of the global population. Source