Polar bear cub makes public debut at Toronto Zoo

Juno, a three-month-old polar bear cub at the Toronto Zoo, is meeting the public for the first time on Saturday.

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The female cub will be visible to adoring fans between 10 a.m. and 12 p.m., and from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

You can meet our polar bear cub starting this Saturday February 27 for #InternationalPolarBearDay ?? pic.twitter.com/gW3eTmRrDp

— The Toronto Zoo (@TheTorontoZoo) February 22, 2016

Juno was born on Remembrance Day and named after Juno Beach in Normandy, France, where Canadian soldiers fought on D-Day in 1944.

We are proud to adopt Juno the polar bear cub as the official “live” mascot of the Canadian Army. #StrongProudReadypic.twitter.com/brdOeiTkjr

— Canadian Army (@CanadianArmy) February 25, 2016

The bear’s twin cub died less than a day after being born.

Juno spent time in intensive care, but officials say she now weighs a healthy 10 kilograms.

The cub’s first public appearance coincides with International Polar Bear Day, an annual event aimed at raising awareness about the negative impact of global warming on the species.



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