6 key gadgets and trends at Mobile World Congress

The Mobile World Congress, the sector's biggest trade fair which wrapped up in Barcelona on Thursday, was dominated this year by the arrival of virtual reality, advances in the development of ultra-fast 5G networks and connected objects.

See Full Article

ROBOT-TELEPHONE THAT READS YOUR MESSAGES: Japanese firm Sharp presented a tiny prototype robot called RoBoHon that doubles as a mobile telephone. It has voice recognition and is able to answer questions by searching online when asked, can take pictures and read text messages you receive out loud.

HOLOGRAMS MAKE AN APPEARANCE: Which science fiction fan has not dreamed of being able to speak to someone far away by hologram? Several firms believe this will be possible when faster 5G mobile networks are running.

Among them is US start-up Leia Inc, named after the heroine of the "Star Wars" franchise, which presented a system that creates a 3D image that appears to float above the screen of a tablet.

SK Telecom's stand featured a beam of green light which caused different images to appear inside it such as a dolphin, a heart or a gymnast's movement.

INVISIBLE CHARGERS: Say good-bye to tangled wires and misplaced charging cables.

Spanish start-up MiniBatt presented a smartphone charging system that can be installed in any piece of furniture, regardless of the material. To charge a device, you just have to put it on top of a desk, chair or table. The company hopes to convince furniture makers to incorporate the charger into its designs.

SMARTPHONE MAKERS BET ON VIRTUAL REALITY: LG unveiled its new virtual reality headset, the 360 VR, which works with its new G5 smartphone.

Rival South Korean firm Samsung revealed its new flagship smartphone, the Galaxy 7, via a virtual reality presentation that used its Gear VR headsets.

Among the most visited stand was South Korea's SK Telecom, which offered a virtual reality ride under water in a yellow submarine, and another by Samsung featuring a virtual reality rollercoaster ride using its Gear VR headsets.

5G REMAINS KEY FOR SECTOR: Several equipment makers and telecom operators offered demonstrations of advantages the new network will bring such as lower latency, or reaction times.

But there were no major announcements on the development of ultra-fast 5G mobile networks, due to be rolled out in 2020 following large-scale testing in 2018.

The European Union did say it will launch an action plan to develop 5G networks and ensure Europe does not fall behind other regions as it did with the 4G network, which is in widespread use at the moment.

MORE CONNECTED OBJECTS: Connecting appliances and other objects to the Internet is the focus of more and more discussions, despite the delays in making it happen.

Research firm Gartner forecasts that the market for Internet of Things services will top $101 billion (92 billion euros) this year, nearly 30 percent more than the $78 billion that businesses spent last year.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Neuroscientist who studied Einstein's brain dies at 90

    Tech & Science CTV News
    OAKLAND, Calif. -- A founder of modern neuroscience who studied Einstein's brain has died. The University of California, Berkeley says Marian Cleeves Diamond was 90 when she died July 25 at her home in Oakland. Source
  • Marian Cleeves Diamond, who studied Albert Einstein's brain, dead at 90

    Tech & Science CTV News
    OAKLAND, Calif. -- Marian Cleeves Diamond, a neuroscientist who studied Albert Einstein's brain and was one of the first to show that the brain can improve with enrichment, has died. The University of California, Berkeley, where Diamond was a professor emerita of integrative biology, confirmed Diamond died July 25 at her home in Oakland, California. Source
  • Turkey bones may help trace fate of ancient cliff dwellers

    Tech & Science CTV News
    DENVER -- Researchers say they have found a new clue into the mysterious exodus of ancient cliff-dwelling people from the Mesa Verde area of Colorado more than 700 years ago: DNA from the bones of domesticated turkeys. Source
  • Scientist looking to bats and bees in fight against antibiotic-resistant superbugs

    Tech & Science CBC News
    A researcher in Halifax hopes that a new high-tech tool will help discover superbug-fighting antibiotics from an unusual source — bat and honeybee colonies. "[Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are] a major concern for hospitals around the world and certainly in Canada and right now," said Clarissa Sit, assistant professor of chemistry at Saint Mary's University. Source
  • July ranks 2nd for heat globally, hottest recorded on land

    Tech & Science CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- Earth yet again sizzled with unprecedented heat last month. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday Earth sweated to its second hottest month since recordkeeping began in 1880. At 61.89 degrees (16.63 Celsius), last month was behind July 2016's all-time record by .09 degrees. Source
  • Science Says: DNA test results may not change health habits

    Tech & Science CBC News
    If you learned your DNA made you more susceptible to getting a disease, wouldn't you work to stay healthy? You'd quit smoking, eat better, ramp up your exercise, or do whatever else it took to improve your odds of avoiding maladies like obesity, diabetes, heart disease or cancer, right? Source
  • Spacewalking cosmonauts release 3-D-printed satellite

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Spacewalking cosmonauts have set free the world's first satellite made with a 3-D printer. Russians Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy ventured outside the International Space Station on Thursday. They promptly released five nanosatellites by hand. Source
  • Spacewalking cosmonauts release 3D-printed satellite

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Spacewalking cosmonauts set free the world's first satellite made almost entirely with a 3D printer on Thursday. In total, Russians Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy ended up releasing five nanosatellites by hand. Source
  • Ancient species of giant sloth discovered in Mexico

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Mexican scientists said Wednesday they have discovered the fossilized remains of a previously unknown species of giant sloth that lived 10,000 years ago and died at the bottom of a sinkhole. The Pleistocene-era remains were found in 2010, but were so deep inside the water-filled sinkhole that researchers were only gradually able to piece together what they were, the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) said in announcing the find. Source
  • Seaworld veterinarians euthanize company's last wild-born killer whale

    Tech & Science CTV News
    SAN DIEGO -- SeaWorld euthanized one of the entertainment company's last killer whales to come from the wild, marking the third orca death this year at one of its marine parks. Kasatka died Tuesday evening "surrounded by members of her pod, as well as the veterinarians and caretakers who loved her," after battling lung disease for years, the company said in a statement. Source