Apple's Tim Cook: Complying with FBI demand 'bad for America'

SAN FRANCISCO -- Apple CEO Tim Cook said Wednesday that it would be "bad for America" if his company complied with the FBI's demand for help unlocking an encrypted iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters.

See Full Article

Cook said he's prepared to take the dispute to the U.S. Supreme Court. He also said he would try to make his case directly to President Barack Obama, although he did not say when or where they would meet.

In his first interview since the controversy erupted last week, Cook told ABC News that it was a difficult decision to resist a court order directing Apple to override security features on an iPhone used by Syed Farook, one of two extremists who killed 14 people in the Southern California city in December.

"Some things are hard and some things are right, and some things are both. This is one of those things," Cook said. The interview came as both sides in the dispute are courting public support, through interviews and published statements, while also mustering legal arguments in the case.

Federal officials have said they're only asking for narrow assistance in bypassing some security features on the iPhone, which they believe may contain information related to the mass murders. Apple has argued that doing so would make other iPhones more susceptible to hacking by authorities or criminals in the future.

The Apple chief expressed sympathy for the shooting victims' families, and said his company provided engineers and technical advice to authorities investigating the case. But he said authorities are now asking the company "to write a piece of software that we view as sort of the equivalent of cancer."

The software could "expose people to incredible vulnerabilities," Cook added, arguing that smartphones contain private information about users and even their families.

"This would be bad for America," he said. "It would also set a precedent that I believe many people in America would be offended by."

Cook disputed FBI Director James Comey's argument that the court order applies to only one phone.

"If a court can ask us to write this piece of software, think about what else they could ask us to write," Cook said. "Maybe it's an operating system for surveillance. Maybe it's the ability for law enforcement to turn on the camera. I mean I don't know where this stops."

A Department of Justice spokeswoman did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Apple is expected to file its legal response to the judge's order by Friday.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Climate change doubling size of northern lakes, pushing bison off habitat

    Tech & Science CTV News
    New research suggests that climate change has mysteriously caused lakes in a northern protected area to nearly double in size, forcing a herd of at-risk bison off some of their best habitat. Lakes in the Mackenzie Bison Sanctuary off the northwest shore of Great Slave Lake are now bigger than any time in at least the last 200 years, said Josh Thienpont, a University of Ottawa scientist and a lead author on th e paper, published Thursday in the journal Nature. Source
  • Canadian Wildlife Federation wants Ottawa to protect prairie grasslands

    Tech & Science CTV News
    The Canadian Wildlife Federation wants Ottawa to stop turning over community pastures to the Prairie provinces because of concerns it has about species at risk. In 2013, the previous Conservative government began a plan to transfer control of 900,000 hectares of community pastureland to Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Alberta by 2018. Source
  • Cool facts about 7 Earth-size planets circling single star

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Talk about an Earth-shattering discovery. Scientists have spotted seven Earth-size planets around a nearby star, some or all of which could harbour water and possibly life. That's the biggest cluster of planets like this yet to be found. Source
  • Apple 'spaceship' headquarters readies for boarding

    Tech & Science CTV News
    The process of moving more than 12,000 people to a new campus that Jobs envisioned as a "center for creativity and collaboration" was expected to continue late into the year. A theater on the new Apple Park campus was named in honor of Jobs, who would have turned 62 on Feb. Source
  • 'Scared to death:' Study finds Arctic killer whales intimidate narwhal

    Tech & Science CTV News
    A study has concluded that the increased presence of killer whales in Arctic waters is intimidating narwhal into drastically changing their behaviour. It's another symptom of how climate change is remaking the delicate northern environment. Source
  • 7 Earth-like planets found orbiting star 39 light-years away

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Scientists have discovered what looks the best place so far where life as we know it may exist outside our own solar system. Seven Earth-sized planets, all of which could contain water, have been found orbiting a small star 39 light-years away. Source
  • SpaceX delays delivery to International Space Station after navigation error

    Tech & Science CBC News
    A navigation error forced SpaceX to delay its shipment to the International Space Station on Wednesday, following an otherwise smooth flight from NASA's historic moon pad. SpaceX's supply ship, the Dragon, was less than a mile from the orbiting outpost when a problem cropped up in the GPS system. Source
  • New Apple headquarters to have theatre named for Steve Jobs

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CUPERTINO, Calif. -- Apple has announced that its new headquarters will open for employees in the spring and will include a theatre named for its late co-founder, Steve Jobs. Apple says in a news release on its website that the process of moving its 12,000 employees from its old digs in Cupertino, California, to the new Apple Park nearby will begin in April and will take more than six months to complete. Source
  • Tiny plastic particles from clothing, tires clogging oceans: report

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Invisible particles washed off products like synthetic clothing and car tires account for up to a third of the plastic polluting oceans, impacting eco-systems and human health, a top conservationist body warned Wednesday. Unlike the shocking images of country-sized garbage patches floating in the oceans, the microplastic particles that wash off textiles and roadways leave the waterways looking pristine. Source
  • NASA to reveal discovery 'beyond our solar system'

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Astronomers at NASA are poised to announce a major discovery involving planets that orbit a star outside our solar system. The announcement will be streamed live at 1 p.m. ET on CTVNews.ca. That’s when more details will be revealed, to coincide with the publication of a a paper on the findings in the journal Nature. Source