Samsung drives into the connected car market

Alongside new smartphones and a virtual reality camera, Samsung will be demonstrating Samsung Connect Auto at this week's Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain.

See Full Article

Described by its makers as ushering in "a new era of driving experience", the Samsung Connect Auto is a dongle that plugs into the diagnostics port of potentially any car built since the 1990s in order to bring it up to date technologically speaking.

"We have been listening to our customers and pushing boundaries to create a connected car ecosystem that seamlessly integrates our products and partner services for a better driving experience," said Dr. Injong Rhee, Executive VP and Head of R&D, Software and Services, Mobile Communications Business at Samsung Electronics. "Through collaborations with valuable partners and experts across many industries, we are carrying out our vision of bringing IoT technology to people's everyday lives."

The device offers wi-fi, monitors driving behavior, and provides tips for saving fuel. It can also give maintenance advice, serve as a vehicle locator and tracker in case of theft; and as a black box for helping users lower their insurance premiums. The final touch is support from a number of partners including Cisco, Orange, Here, and AT&T.

"Samsung's willingness to work with others to create an ecosystem of true interoperability will allow it to be one of the leaders in the aftermarket connected vehicle space," said Chris Penrose, Senior Vice President, Internet of Things, AT&T Business Solutions.

However, the gadget is not a new idea. US startup, Automatic Labs has been selling its own $99 plug-in dongle and smartphone app offering almost identical services since 2012 and in 2015 launched an ecosystem of car-focused apps from other companies.

At MWC, Samsung is also partnering with Seat and SAP to develop solutions for the connected car of tomorrow. The first solutions include a method of reserving a parking space and paying for it without leaving the car and a digital key that lets owners share their cars.

Volvo is also demonstrating a very similar system at MWC. However, unlike the Swedish brand, Seat is a true mass-market marque, meaning this technology could soon be available to everyone.

"For Seat, connectivity is a key factor. This technological alliance with Samsung and SAP strengthen Seat's aim of becoming a reference in the field of connectivity," said Executive Committee President Luca de Meo.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • NASA tests nuclear power system for future astronauts on Mars

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Initial tests in Nevada on a compact nuclear power system designed to sustain a long-duration NASA human mission on the inhospitable surface of Mars have been successful and a full-power run is scheduled for March, officials said on Thursday. Source
  • Why some fracking wells are prone to triggering earthquakes

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Why does fracking cause earthquakes in some places and not others? Alberta scientists say they've figured out some factors that make certain wells prone to triggering earthquakes. That could help make it possible to forecast the risk of fracking-induced earthquakes in the future. Source
  • Whales, dolphins will no longer be displayed at Vancouver Aquarium

    Tech & Science CTV News
    VANCOUVER - The Vancouver Aquarium has announced that it will no longer display whales or dolphins. Aquarium president John Nightingale says in a statement that the facility will focus instead on raising awareness of ocean issues impacting other marine animals. Source
  • 2017 was 2nd-warmest across the globe since 1880, NASA says

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Last year was the second-warmest across the globe since 1880, NASA reported Thursday. The global surface temperature average in 2017 was 0.90 C warmer than the 1951–1980 mean, surpassed only by 2016. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), however, 2017 was the third-warmest year. Source
  • Fluctuating temperatures claim Montreal's natural Beaver Lake ice rink for good

    Tech & Science CTV News
    MONTREAL - Skating on Beaver Lake, a popular Montreal winter pastime for decades, is now a thing of the past. The city's decision to shutter the natural ice rink has to do with constantly shifting winter temperatures that make it impossible to keep the surface safe. Source
  • Even without El Nino last year, Earth keeps on warming

    Tech & Science CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- Earth last year wasn't quite as hot as 2016's record-shattering mark, but it ranked second or third, depending on who was counting. Either way, scientists say it showed a clear signal of man-made global warming because it was the hottest year they've seen without an El Nino boosting temperatures naturally. Source
  • Pair of Chinese giant pandas get snowy welcome in Finland

    Tech & Science CTV News
    HELSINKI -- A pair of giant pandas has arrived in snowy Finland, China's gift to mark the small Nordic nation's 100 years of independence. Four-year-old male panda Hua Bao and three-year old female Jin Baobao were welcomed Thursday in a ceremony at Helsinki airport attended by the Chinese ambassador to Finland and Finnish officials. Source
  • Dashcam video captures meteor blazing across sky in Alberta

    Tech & Science CTV News
    A mysterious, large fireball seen soaring through the night sky in Alberta on Wednesday was a meteor, an astronomer has confirmed. “We do know that last night at about 5:22 p.m. there was a bright meteor, sometimes called a fireball or bolide, seen off towards the northeast of Edmonton, at least from the local reports,” Frank Florian, as astronomer at TELUS World of Science, told CTV Edmonton on Thursday. Source
  • Political pachyderms: Save the Elephants turns to Trudeau for latest name

    Tech & Science CTV News
    OTTAWA -- Sophie Gregoire Trudeau is hanging out with some heavy hitters these days -- names like Michelle Obama and Martha Washington. She eats fruit and tree bark, and spends her time caring for her nine-month-old son. Source
  • Scientists calculate proteins in a single cell and find 42 million

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Proteins are considered the hardest-working components of cells, influencing everything from structure to function — so cell biologists try to determine their numbers and any changes in the count. The number of protein molecules in a simple cell such as a yeast cell wasn't known with much certainty until now, say researchers from both the University of Toronto and a San Francisco-based biotechnology company that studies aging. Source