Some victims of mass shooting support efforts to hack iPhone

WASHINGTON -- Some victims of the mass shootings in southern California and their families will file documents in support of a U.S.

See Full Article

magistrate judge's order that Apple Inc. help the FBI hack into a locked iPhone as part of the terrorism investigation, a lawyer said Monday.

A Los Angeles attorney, Stephen Larson, said he represents at least several families of victims and other employees he declined to identify but who were involved in the shootings. He said the U.S. attorney in the case, Ellen Decker, sought his help. Larson said he will file a brief supporting the Justice Department before March 3.

The victims "have questions that go simply beyond the criminal investigation ... in terms of why this happened, how this happened, why they were targeted, is there anything about them on the iPhone -- things that are more of a personal victim" view, Larson said.

An appeal by victims in the case gives the Justice Department additional support in a case that has sparked a national debate over digital privacy rights and national security interests. Magistrate Judge Sheri Pym in California ordered Apple last week to assist investigators by creating specialized software that would let the FBI rapidly test random passcode combinations to try to unlock the iPhone and view data stored on it.

The county-issued iPhone 5C was used by Syed Farook, who with his wife, Tashfeen Malik, killed 14 people at an office holiday party in December before they died in a gun battle with police. The government said they had been at least partly inspired by the Islamic State.

The couple physically destroyed two personal phones so completely that the FBI has been unable to recover information from them.

Farook had worked as a county health inspector. Larson said the government has a strong case because of Farook's diminished privacy interests as a "dead, murderous terrorist" and because the phone was owned by his employer, the county government. "You're weighing that against the interest of enforcement in an investigation and the victims and their interest in obtaining this knowledge," he said.

Larson, a former U.S. district judge, said he knew Pym, the magistrate, and described her as an "extraordinary jurist" when she argued in his courtroom as a then-federal prosecutor.

Apple Inc. CEO Tim Cook acknowledged in a letter to employees earlier Monday that that "it does not feel right" to refuse to help the FBI, but he said to do so would threaten data security for millions by creating essentially a master key that could later be duplicated and used against other phones.

"We have no tolerance or sympathy for terrorists," Cook wrote in an early morning email. "When they commit unspeakable acts like the tragic attacks in San Bernardino, we work to help the authorities pursue justice for the victims."

Cook's email came hours after FBI director James Comey said in an online post that Apple owes it to the San Bernardino victims to co-operate and the FBI "can't look the survivors in the eye, or ourselves in the mirror, if we don't follow this lead."



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Florida moves to control booming, invasive iguanas

    Tech & Science CTV News
    MIAMI -- With burrowing iguanas showing up in people's toilets and damaging expensive sewer lines, Florida wildlife managers are stepping up efforts to control the state's booming population of the wild, invasive reptiles. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has hired a trapper to try and control the iguana population on public land in the Florida Keys. Source
  • The internet can be a powerful tool for good, but only if everyone can get online

    Tech & Science CBC News
    One of the Internet's greatest attributes is its potential to be a democratizing tool. As the most powerful networked technology ever created, by design, every user has can have a platform and a loudspeaker. Unlike previous communication technologies, like radio or television, which broadcast one message to the masses, with the rise of the internet came the ability for individuals to not only be part of an audience, but broadcasters in their own right. Source
  • Dalai Lama turns to iPhone to spread app-iness

    Tech & Science CTV News
    He already has millions of Twitter followers and has spoken of the wonders of new technology. Now the Dalai Lama has launched a new iPhone app so devotees can keep track of his travels and teachings. Source
  • Facebook admits that mindless scrolling can make you feel bad

    Tech & Science CTV News
    MENLO PARK, Calif. - It's not quite like tobacco companies warning about the dangers of smoking, but Facebook is acknowledging something many already know: Passively scrolling through social media can make you feel bad. The social media giant whose platform has become a daily addiction for hundreds of millions of people sheds light on both sides of the issue a blog post Friday. Source
  • SpaceX 1st: Recycled rocket soars with recycled capsule

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- SpaceX racked up another first on Friday, launching a recycled rocket with a recycled capsule on a grocery run for NASA. The unmanned Falcon rocket blasted off with a just-in-time-for-Christmas delivery for the International Space Station, taking flight again after a six-month turnaround. Source
  • Watch: 8 adorable seal pups flop back into the water in B.C.

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Eight rescued harbour seal pups bounced their way across the shoreline and into the waters of Howe Sound in B.C. as a team of volunteers from the Vancouver Aquarium proudly cheered them on. The seal pups had been saved from various places in B.C. Source
  • Scientists mobilize for a fight over powerful gene-editing technology

    Tech & Science CBC News
    It sounds like the plot of a science fiction novel: Scientists discover how to eradicate an entire species. Environmentalists want to stop the research. A United Nations committee invites experts to an online forum to consider the facts. Source
  • Moose calves rescued in northern B.C. are 'golden nuggets': researcher

    Tech & Science CTV News
    After months of bottle-feedings and curfews, a pair of moose calves rescued in northern British Columbia are thriving and giving hope for other orphaned wildlife in the region. Roy Rea, an instructor at the University of Northern British Columbia, says the male and female calves were only days old when they were discovered near Prince George in late May. Source
  • Electric cars will be cheaper than gas models but Canada lags in EV policy

    Tech & Science CTV News
    OTTAWA - A Canadian energy think tank says the world is less than a decade away from the tipping point at which electric cars will cost the same as conventional gas-powered vehicles. But in a report released Thursday, Clean Energy Canada says this country is lagging on the government polices that elsewhere are helping spur consumers to adopt the new technology despite reservations about everything from price to reliability to the distance they can travel on a single charge. Source
  • For the first time ever, a coal mine with carbon caps has been approved by Canadian government

    Tech & Science CBC News
    For the first time ever, a coal mine in Canada will have a cap on carbon emissions. On Dec. 13, the federal government approved the Murray River Mining Project near Tumbler Ridge, in northeast B.C. The project — by HD Mining International — will operate underground to mine metallurgical coal, known as coking coal, used to produce steel. Source