Dolphin dies after being passed around on beach for photographs

The death of a small, long-nosed dolphin at the hands of a group of beachgoers has prompted a warning from the Wildlife Foundation in Argentina.

See Full Article

According to the foundation, at least one Franciscana dolphin died after it was scooped up from the shore and paraded along the beach in Santa Teresita, Argentina.

Images on social media show visitors at the beach crowding around the small mammal and lifting it up to pet and photograph it.

A caption alongside the photos says the dolphin was the second mammal to wash up on the beach that day.

In a notice published on Tuesday, the wildlife foundation says at least one dolphin died in the photo-taking frenzy.

The foundation says the animal's death should serve a reminder that beached dolphins cannot survive out of water, and that they need to be returned to the ocean as soon as possible.

Franciscana dolphins, which are also known as Franciscan or Plata dolphins, only grow to be about 1.3 to 1.7 metres long, and their slender noses can make up as much as 15 per cent of their body length, the Whale and Dolphin Conservation charity says.

The small mammals are named after Franciscan monks, because the animal's brown-toned skin resembles the monks' habits.

Franciscana dolphins are found along the east coast of Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature has classified the species as "vulnerable" since 2008.

According to the conservation union, the biggest threat to the Franciscana dolphin population is accidental death in gillnet fisheries.

Segundo delfín que aparece en el día en Santa Teresita una lastima no creo que vivan

Posted by Hernan Coria on Wednesday, 10 February 2016


Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • World's oldest seabird, a 66-year-old albatross, expecting chicks

    Tech & Science CTV News
    This Nov. 28, 2015 photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows the world's oldest known seabird, Wisdom, right, tending to an egg she laid, with her mate, at Midway Atoll, a wildlife refuge about 1,200 miles northwest of Honolulu. Source
  • Scientists hunt for carbon monoxide poisoning antidote

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Scientists are on the trail of a potential antidote for carbon monoxide poisoning, an injected "scavenger" that promises to trap and remove the gas from blood within minutes. It's very early-stage research — but a reminder that, however it turns out, there are steps people should take now to protect themselves from this silent killer. Source
  • Virtual reality a sickening experience

    Tech & Science CBC News
    A new study has found that many people — especially women — who use virtual reality 3D goggles, experience motion sickness after 15 minutes of use. As the technology becomes more common, wearers will have to adapt to the new sensations the way sailors and astronauts do on the seas and in space. Source
  • Third-ever natural quasicrystal found in Siberian meteorite

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Scientists have discovered an incredibly rare and unusual crystal, known as a quasicrystal, in a meteorite previously found in Siberia in 2011. While there are over 100 lab-made quasicrystals, this crystal, identified in a new paper published Thursday in Scientific Reports, is the first quasicrystal to be found in naturethat wasn’t previously also discovered in a lab. Source
  • Scientists explore why time flies when you're having fun

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Time stands still when you're stuck in traffic. It flies when you're binge-watching Stranger Things. A team of neuroscientists in Portugal has discovered a group of neurons in the brains of mice that may help explain why our perception of time passing — either slowly or quickly — is so subjective. Source
  • 'Sexist' banquet joke riles researchers at Arctic science conference in Winnipeg

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Canada's annual gathering of top Arctic scientists is roiling after researchers released an open letter protesting what they call a sexist joke at the conference's gala banquet, which the executive director is defending as a "linguistic misspeak. Source
  • Samsung, Google, Facebook and Sony join forces to drive VR development

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Together, partners in the alliance hope to shape the future of virtual reality by developing this emerging industry and taking it forward in synergy with consumers. This implies making all of their debates and their most advanced research available to web users, while also taking on board user feedback. Source
  • Bluetooth 5 set to boost the Internet of Things in 2017

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Bluetooth is a widely used wireless communication standard for securely sharing data over short distances between two electronic devices via a specific set of radio waves. The technology features in many connected devices, such as laptops, smartphones, wireless headphones and smartwatches, allowing them to connect and communicate wirelessly. Source
  • The patent trap? Open science advocates want CRISPR technology to be free

    Tech & Science CBC News
    They lined up early Monday morning for ringside seats at the most sensational scientific showdown in the modern era. The moment the doors opened, lawyers, reporters and hedge fund investors raced for a spot in the cramped, windowless U.S. Source
  • Inuvik teacher's 'never-ending encouragement' leads to prestigious polar mentor award

    Tech & Science CBC News
    "It was shock and humility and it's a great honour," said Joel McAlister, a senior instructor in the Environment and Natural Resources Technology program at Aurora College in Inuvik, N.W.T. McAlister was recognized as Mentor of the Year by the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists Canada (APECS) and the ArcticNet Student Association (ASA) Wednesday night in Winnipeg. Source