Uber to pay $28.5M to settle safety ad lawsuits

SAN FRANCISCO -- Uber says that it will pay $28.5 million to settle two lawsuits that said the ride-hailing firm misled customers about its safety procedures and fees.

See Full Article

The company told a federal judge in San Francisco that it wants to settle the class-action lawsuits by paying about 25 million riders who made U.S. trips between Jan. 1, 2013, and Jan. 31, 2016.

The judge must still approve the deal.

"We are glad to put these cases behind us and we will continue to invest in new technology and great customer services so that we can help improve safety in the cities we serve," the San Francisco-based company said in a statement Thursday.

The lawsuits attacked Uber for charging a fee of up to $2.30 per trip for what it called industry-leading background checks on would-be drivers. However, Uber didn't do the kind of fingerprint checks required of taxi drivers.

Under the settlement, Uber also would stop using certain "safety-related" advertising language and would rename its "Safe Ride Fee" as a "Booking Fee."

Uber said its technology does provide safety features, such as track trips through GPS and sharing a driver's photo identification and license plate number before the passenger gets into the car.

"However no means of transportation can ever be 100 percent safe. Accidents and incidents do happen," Uber said. "That's why it's important to ensure that the language we use to describe safety at Uber is clear and precise."

Similar lawsuits filed by the district attorneys of San Francisco and Los Angeles are still pending.

The prosecutors settled a similar lawsuit with Uber competitor Lyft in 2014. Lyft agreed to pay $250,000 and to stop claiming its background checks were among the best in the industry.

Uber and its competitors have encountered various political hurdles as they expand services.

Government entities around the globe are grappling with how to regulate and monitor ride-hailing companies. Taxi and limousine drivers and companies complain that the app makers should be subjected to the same regulations and fees they face around the world.

The ride-booking companies counter that their drivers are private contractors who use the startups' technology to find customers in need of rides.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • 'Go to sleep. The stream can wait'; Gamer who died during 24-hour marathon 'was in rough shape'

    Tech & Science Toronto Sun
    VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. — The Virginia man who died while during a 24-hour gaming marathon appeared to be in "rough shape" before leaving for a smoke break he never returned from, a friend said. Brian Vigneault, 35, had spent about 22 hours playing the online war game World of Tanks on the streaming platform Twitch.tv. Source
  • Horizon Zero Dawn review: PS4 exclusive a perfect gaming experience

    Tech & Science Toronto Sun
    In Horizon Zero Dawn, there are robot animals to fight, bloodthirsty bandits to eliminate and millennium-spanning mysteries to uncover. Yet, every time I turned a corner in this lushly detailed video game world, I was sucked into some incredible new spectacle. Source
  • Finding life on 7 exoplanets will be a challenge: Bob McDonald

    Tech & Science CBC News
    The possibility of finding life on other worlds got a huge boost this week with the announcement that seven Earth-sized planets have been found around a nearby star, three of which lie within the so-called habitable zone where water, and therefore life, could exist on their surfaces. Source
  • Google rolls out artificial intelligence tool for media companies to combat online trolls

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Google said it will begin offering media groups an artificial intelligence tool designed to stamp out incendiary comments on their websites. The programming tool, called Perspective, aims to assist editors trying to moderate discussions by filtering out abusive "troll" comments, which Google says can stymie smart online discussions. Source
  • Survey finds two High Arctic polar bear populations stable

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Polar bears in two High Arctic populations seem to be doing better than scientists had thought. The first major study of the Baffin Bay and Kane Basin populations in about 20 years has found more bears than population models predicted. Source
  • N.S. launches probe after massive winter storm damages fish farm, frees salmon

    Tech & Science CTV News
    SHELBURNE, N.S. -- Nova Scotia fisheries officials are investigating after a winter storm damaged an aquaculture pen in Shelburne Harbour, apparently releasing some salmon. Fisheries Minister Keith Colwell says the fish farm is owned by New Brunswick-based Cooke Aquaculture, which reported the damage last Wednesday after a massive storm. Source
  • Radiation may prove more potent than pesticide against pepper pest

    Tech & Science CBC News
    You may not have heard of the pepper weevil, but it's said to have cost Ontario farmers $83 million in crop damage in 2016. Now, scientists hope a blast of cobalt gamma radiation will prove more potent – and less problematic – than pesticides in controlling the creature. Source
  • Czech zoo welcomes baby Indian rhinoceros

    Tech & Science CTV News
    PLZEN, Czech Republic -- A zoo in the Czech Republic has welcomed a new baby rhinoceros. The Indian rhino was born Feb. 5 at Zoo Plzen, 95 kilometres (60 miles) west of Prague. She weighed around 47 kilograms (104 pounds) at birth and is now up to 70 kilograms (154 pounds. Source
  • NASA contemplating sending crew on deep-space mission

    Tech & Science CTV News
    NASA will hold a news conference Friday, to discuss the possibility of sending a crew on the first launch of the deep-space Orion spacecraft it hopes to send to Mars one day. The teleconference, scheduled for 1 p.m. Source
  • NASA contemplating sending crew on deep-space rocket's first flight

    Tech & Science CTV News
    NASA will hold a news conference Friday, to discuss the possibility of sending a crew on the first launch of the deep-space Orion spacecraft it hopes to send to Mars one day. The teleconference, scheduled for 1 p.m. Source