Agencies claim Facebook is breaching privacy laws in France

PARIS -- Two agencies contend Facebook is breaching privacy laws in France by tracking and using the personal data of more than 30 million users, as well as non-users who are browsing the Internet.

See Full Article

The government-linked General Direction for Competition, Consumer Affairs and Fraud Control on Tuesday issued a formal notice giving Facebook two months to comply with French data protection laws or risk sanctions. The independent privacy watchdog CNIL earlier set a three-month limit ahead of eventual fines.

CNIL said that Facebook collects data about account holders' "political or religious opinions" and "sexual orientation," without informing them and compiles information on account holders to be used for targeted advertising. By failing to provide tools to prevent such use, Facebook violates users' "fundamental rights and interests," including respect for privacy, CNIL said.

The California-based company also collects data of non-Facebook users' Internet browsing without their knowledge when they visit a public Facebook page and uses the information it collects for targeted advertising, according to the statement.

The agency asked Facebook to "fairly collect data" of non-account holders and provide account holders with the means to object to compilation of data for advertising purposes, the statement said.

"This notice is not a sanction and the procedure will be publicly closed" if Facebook complies with the French data protection act, CNIL's statement said. Without compliance the matter may be referred to a special committee that decides on sanctions. CNIL's regulations call for sanctions of up to 150,000 euros ($170,000) in such cases.

The other agency, under the Economy Ministry, accused Facebook on Tuesday of removing without consultation content or information posted by users and unilaterally changing its terms and conditions without informing users in advance.

If changes relating to those complaints are not made within two months, the social network could risk a fine of up to 15,000 euros ($17,000) and a civil trial over allegedly illegal clauses, according to the Consumer Affairs and Fraud Control agency.

There was no immediate response to email queries to Facebook for comment.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Google's AI wins Go match in China, but blocks online broadcast

    Tech & Science CBC News
    ?Internet users outside China watched a computer defeat its national go champion, but few Chinese web surfers could see it. Censors blocked access to Tuesday's online broadcast by Google, which organized the game in a town west of Shanghai during a forum on artificial intelligence. Source
  • Rare piebald moose caught on video in western Newfoundland

    Tech & Science CBC News
    A photographer in western Newfoundland captured what he calls a "once in a lifetime" encounter with an unusual patterned moose this week. Gerard Gale, who runs his own photography business, was in Black Duck Siding near Stephenville on Monday when he spotted a large mostly-white moose having a snack on some bushes. Source
  • China blocks online broadcast of computer Go match

    Tech & Science CTV News
    BEIJING -- Internet users outside China watched a computer defeat its national Go champion, but few Chinese web surfers could see it. Censors blocked access to Tuesday's online broadcast by Google, which organized the game in a town west of Shanghai during a forum on artificial intelligence. Source
  • Scientists may have found out why whales are so big

    Tech & Science CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- Scientists think they have answered a whale of a mystery: How the ocean creatures got so huge so quickly. A few million years ago, the largest whales, averaged maybe 15 feet long. Source
  • Canadian students win big at robotics world championship

    Tech & Science CTV News
    For the second time in 15 years, Canadian students excelled at a global robotics competition. Toronto’s Bayview Glen School came in first out of 32,000 teams at the FIRST (For Inspiration & Recognition of Science & Technology) LEGO League world festival, held in St. Source
  • Egypt moves bed, chariot of King Tut to new museum

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAIRO -- Egypt has safely transported two unique items, a funerary bed and a chariot belonging to the famed pharaoh King Tutankhamun from a museum in central Cairo to a new one on the other side of the city. Source
  • Flood prediction, climate change impacts on water studied at new Canmore lab

    Tech & Science CBC News
    At a new research lab in Canmore, Alta., scientists are studying the impact of climate change on water, glaciers and snow, and developing tools to predict and warn people about future floods. The Coldwater Laboratory, led by John Pomeroy, recently moved from the Barrier Lake Field Station in Kananaskis Country to the Bow Valley. Source
  • Battery boast, better viewing angles for refreshed Microsoft Surface

    Tech & Science Toronto Sun
    NEW YORK — Microsoft is refreshing its Surface Pro tablet with longer battery life and faster processors. The new, fifth-generation device — simply called Surface Pro — won’t look or feel drastically different from its predecessor. But Microsoft is hoping its under-the-hood improvements will help it compete with newer laptop-tablet hybrids from Samsung and others. Source
  • Trump budget cuts funding for clean air and water programs

    Tech & Science CBC News
    The Trump Administration budget released Tuesday slashes funding for the Environmental Protection Agency by nearly one-third, laying off thousands of employees while imposing dramatic cuts to clean air and water programs. The White House's proposed spending plan for the EPA amounts to less than $5.7 billion, a 31 per cent cut from the current budget year, according to a briefing provided in advance to the media. Source
  • Spacewalking astronauts tackle urgent station repairs

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Spacewalking astronauts are making urgent repairs at the International Space Station. Commander Peggy Whitson and Jack Fischer went out Tuesday morning, three days after a critical relay box abruptly stopped working. Source