Google offers extra Drive space for Safer Internet Day

Google have announced that they are giving away 2GB of free Drive storage Tuesday to users who check and update their security settings.

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in a similar move to last year, the company will again be offering the free Google Drive storage space, with users who took part last year still able to claim the free space this year.

Users just need to pass through the brief security checkup to review their account in order to claim the permanent Drive space. The process takes under a minute and includes a check of settings such as account recovery information and which apps have access to your Google account.

Google's offer is running at the same time as this year's Safer Internet Day 2016, designed to promote a safer and more secure use of the internet and technology.



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