Live and 'here to stay': CEO responds to 'RIP Twitter' outcry

No, Twitter as people know it is not coming to an end, says the company's CEO.

In a series of tweets, Twitter boss Jack Dorsey attempted to snuff out rumours that the social media giant was planning to implement an algorithmic timeline, similar to that used by Facebook, which would cater to what it thinks people most want to see.

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Since Twitter's launch, tweets have been organized in reverse chronological order.

On Saturday, Dorsey assured users that "Twitter is real-time" and it is "here to stay."

Hello Twitter! Regarding #RIPTwitter: I want you all to know we're always listening. We never planned to reorder timelines next week.

— Jack (@jack) February 6, 2016

Twitter is live. Twitter is real-time. Twitter is about who & what you follow. And Twitter is here to stay! By becoming more Twitter-y.

— Jack (@jack) February 6, 2016

I *love* real-time. We love the live stream. It's us. And we're going to continue to refine it to make Twitter feel more, not less, live!

— Jack (@jack) February 6, 2016

Earlier on Saturday, a report that Twitter was planning to introduce the changes to its timeline as early as next week sent users into a frenzy, with many using the hashtag #RIPTwitter to express their angst over the alleged change.

The whole point of @twitter is that you see tweets in real time. Removing that removes basically the entire point of Twitter #RIPTwitter

— Derek Schall (@Schald25) February 6, 2016

So, Twitter is now going to be just like Facebook? If I wanted to be on Facebook, then I would be there & not here. #RIPTwitter

— Austin D. Jordan (@AustinDJordan) February 6, 2016

I stopped using Facebook because I liked Twitter more, now if Twitter starts turning into Facebook I have no idea where to go...#RIPTwitter

— Ziovo (@ziovo_) February 6, 2016

Setting up a MySpace page brb #RIPTwitter

— ??? (@inferable) February 6, 2016

#RIPTwitter literal. pic.twitter.com/OBczOZCVDs

— Fernando Romero (@fer1618) February 6, 2016

Dorsey, who co-founded Twitter nine years ago, has shown a willingness to change key tenets of Twitter's platform, since he returned as the company's CEO in October.

In November, the company changed the term "favourites" to "likes" – a term that has been traditionally used by Facebook.

Dorsey has also hinted that the company is exploring the possibility of loosening its 140-character restriction, which has been central to its format since its inception.



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