Computer beats human in ancient Chinese game

NEW YORK — A computer program has beaten a human champion at the ancient Chinese board game Go, marking a significant advance for development of artificial intelligence.

See Full Article

The program had taught itself how to win, and its developers say its learning strategy may someday let computers help solve real-world problems like making medical diagnoses and pursuing scientific research.

The program and its victory are described in a paper released Wednesday by the journal Nature.

Computers previously have surpassed humans for other games, including chess, checkers and backgammon. But among classic games, Go has long been viewed as the most challenging for artificial intelligence to master.

Go, which originated in China more than 2,500 years ago, involves two players who take turns putting markers on a checkerboard-like grid. The object is to surround more area on the board with the markers than one's opponent, as well as capturing the opponent's pieces by surrounding them.

While the rules are simple, playing it well is not. It's "probably the most complex game ever devised by humans," Dennis Hassabis of Google DeepMind in London, one of the study authors, told reporters Tuesday.

The new program, AlphaGo, defeated the European champion in all five games of a match in October, the Nature paper reports.

In March, AlphaGo will face legendary player Lee Sedol in Seoul, South Korea, for a $1 million prize, Hassabis said.

Martin Mueller, a computing science professor at the University of Alberta in Canada who has worked on Go programs for 30 years but didn't participate in AlphaGo, said the new program "is really a big step up from everything else we've seen.... It's a very, very impressive piece of work."

The ancient Chinese game of Go is one of the last games where the best human players can still beat the best artificial...

Posted by Mark Zuckerberg on Tuesday, January 26, 2016


Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • New technology helps legally-blind boy see Jets game

    Tech & Science CTV News
    A pair of high-tech glasses enabled a 10-year-old boy from Manitoba to see his first Winnipeg Jets game Saturday. Benjamyn Francey is legally-blind due to a rare eye condition called Leber's congenital amaurosis. This condition means Francey can only see colours and silhouettes. Source
  • 'Few examples of concrete action:' Study says Nunavut climate adaptation slow

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Programs to help people adapt to climate change in a part of Canada where help may be needed the most are stuck in the ice, a study has concluded. For more than a decade Inuit in Nunavut have been saying that the old ways for building, travel and hunting on the land no longer apply. Source
  • How coffee grounds turned firewood could be a lifeline for refugees

    Tech & Science CBC News
    The remnants of your morning cup of coffee could be a lifeline for refugees living in camps in sub-saharan Africa. A group of University of Toronto students have created Moto, an alternative to firewood that uses recycled coffee grounds. Source
  • California scientist names moth species after Donald Trump

    Tech & Science CTV News
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- A scientist in California has named a newly discovered moth species after President-elect Donald Trump, saying the white and yellow scales on the insect's head are reminiscent of Trump's blond hairdo. The moth was named Neopalpa donadltrumpi by evolutionary biologist Dr. Source
  • Canadian scientist names moth species after Donald Trump

    Tech & Science CTV News
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- A scientist in California has named a newly discovered moth species after President-elect Donald Trump, saying the white and yellow scales on the insect's head are reminiscent of Trump's blond hairdo. The moth was named Neopalpa donadltrumpi by Canadian evolutionary biologist Dr. Source
  • New species of prehistoric palm discovered in Canada

    Tech & Science CBC News
    A researcher identified a new species of small palm that once grew in Canada after examining a fossil that had been part of an Alberta museum collection for decades. Palms are typically associated with warm, tropical climates. Source
  • Trump administration's energy policy aims to revive America's coal industry

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Less than an hour after the inauguration of U.S. President Donald Trump, the new administration outlined on the White House website its energy policy, which aims to focus on gas and oil, and reviving the coal industry. Source
  • Less than hour after inauguration, Trump publishes energy policy to revive coal industry

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Less than an hour after the inauguration of U.S. President Donald Trump, the new administration outlined on the White House website its energy policy, which aims to focus on gas and oil, and reviving the coal industry. Source
  • Science 'Trumped' by belief: Bob McDonald

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Donald Trump has stated clearly that he believes climate change is a hoax and that vaccines cause autism, two topics that have been clearly proven by science to be untrue. Now, he has a team of players that are carrying these beliefs to other levels of government. Source
  • Trump makes cyberwarfare an official priority for new White House

    Tech & Science CBC News
    U.S. President Donald Trump will make cyberwarfare a "priority" in the fight against ISIS and other terrorist organizations, the new administration revealed on Friday. The White House website was updated shortly after President Trump's inauguration — offering little insight into the government's plans, but the clearest official indication yet that the government is actively engaged in digital attacks. Source