'3D audio' headphones promise to immerse wearers in sound

The audio world is currently in the grips of a minor revolution, as a new type of headphones is poised to bring a cutting-edge audio experience to the market.

See Full Article

Developed by the likes of the American audio firm Jabra and the French start-up 3D Sound Labs, this new generation of "3D audio" headphones offers unprecedented immersion in audio environments, much to the joy of music lovers, movie buffs and gamers.

3D audio virtually positions sound sources all around the listener's head, immersing them in a 360-degree sound sphere that mimics the experience of being plunged into the heart of a concert, a movie or a video game. To achieve this, 3D audio headphones are equipped with a whole load of sensors (GPS, gyroscope, compass, accelerometer, etc.) to adapt the sound output to the surrounding environment and to movement of the wearer's head.

The 3D Sound One, developed by French start-up 3D Sound Labs, was first showcased at CES 2015, before a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign raised funds for production. It's now available to buy for approximately $324, and is currently compatible with devices running Windows or iOS (via the 3D Audio Player mobile application).

Jabra too has presented its first 3D audio headphones, although for the time being they're only aimed at developers. To promote its technology, the American manufacturer has teamed up with Microsoft and the Guide Dogs UK charity in the aim of adapting these intelligent audio headphones into a tool for visually impaired users. The headphones could be used to create an audio image of a wearer's surroundings, immersing them realistically in a given environment. Jabra unveiled its "Intelligent Headset Developer Edition" at the CES 2016 consumer technology show in Las Vegas. As yet, it's only available in the U.S. for $420.

These kinds of headphones, which connect over Bluetooth and use specific software and applications, are designed to offer a portable alternative to 3D audio setups like home theater systems, which take up a lot of room and can be very expensive.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • D.C. zoo officials hoping get panda Mei Xiang pregnant again

    Tech & Science CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- Zoo officials in Washington are hoping to get panda mom Mei Xiang pregnant -- again. Smithsonian National Zoo officials say they performed two artificial inseminations Thursday on 18-year-old Mei Xiang. Officials say they were closely monitoring her for when to do the procedure. Source
  • Using the wrong emoji can cost you — literally

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Imagine if an emoji — one casually fired off in a text-message conversation — ended up costing the sender thousands of dollars. Or $3,000, to be exact. That's what happened in Israel recently, after a judge determined that a message containing a string of emojis conveyed clear intent. Source
  • Yukon looks to preserve and manage grizzly bear population

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Grizzly bears are generally doing "quite well" in Yukon, according to government biologist Tom Jung — and wildlife officials are aiming to keep it that way. The territorial government is developing a conservation and management plan for the species, and it's asking Yukoners to weigh in on what that plan might look like. Source
  • 'Aggressive' coyotes close down Calgary greenspace

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Officials in Calgary have shut down a greenspace in the Panorama Hills area of the city after complaints about aggressive coyotes. Area resident Gavin de Jong, who has young children, says the coyotes seem particularly aggressive this year. Source
  • NASA'S Juno spacecraft finds chaotic weather, massive cyclones over Jupiter's poles

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Once it began skimming the giant gas planet's cloud tops last year, NASA's Juno spacecraft spotted chaotic weather, including enormous cyclones over Jupiter's poles, according to new research. Scientists released their first major findings Thursday. "What we've learned so far is earth-shattering. Source
  • New research reveals what happens when adults learn to read

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Learning to read is hard when you are a kid, and even harder as an adult. New research published Wednesday in Science Advances has revealed what your brain is doing when you learn to read as an adult, and found that brain regions associated with ancient functions are largely responsible for our ability to read. Source
  • Forecasters predict above-normal Atlantic hurricane season

    Tech & Science CTV News
    MIAMI -- Warm ocean waters could fuel an above-normal Atlantic hurricane season, while storm-suppressing El Nino conditions are expected to be scarce, U.S. government forecasters said Thursday. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration forecast calls for 11 to 17 named storms, with five to nine hurricanes. Source
  • Google AI wins 2nd game against Chinese go champion

    Tech & Science CBC News
    A computer beat China's top player of go, one of the last games machines have yet to master, for a second time Thursday in a competition authorities limited the Chinese public's ability to see. Ke Jie lost despite playing what Google's AlphaGo indicated was the best game any opponent has played against it, said Demis Hassabis, founder of the company that developed the program. Source
  • Honeybee losses in U.S. decline, but some warn too early to celebrate

    Tech & Science CBC News
    There's a glimmer of hope for America's ailing honeybees as winter losses were the lowest in more than a decade, according to a U.S. survey of beekeepers released Thursday. Beekeepers lost 21 per cent of their colonies over last winter, the annual Bee Informed Partnership survey found. Source
  • U.S. honeybee losses improve from horrible to bad

    Tech & Science CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- There's a glimmer of hope for America's ailing honeybees as winter losses were the lowest in more than a decade, according to a U.S. survey of beekeepers released Thursday. Beekeepers lost 21 per cent of their colonies over last winter, the annual Bee Informed Partnership survey found. Source