Researcher working to solve soybean yield mystery

WILLISTON, N.D. -- A North Dakota State University official wants to find out why research plots of soybeans are producing better yields than what farmers on average are getting.

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NDSU extension agronomist and project co-ordinator Hans Kandel tells the Williston Herald that if the study is successful, it could improve soybean production statewide.

Kandel says the yield gap exists across the state but is slightly higher in the east than in the west. He says some trial plots in the east are producing yields of 50 bushels per acre, while the statewide average is in the range of 35 bushels.

Kandel believes variety selection, planting date and plant population might be factors. He hopes to have some study results before spring planting.



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