Hey Bei Bei: Panda cub makes U.S. zoo debut

WASHINGTON - Panda cub Bei Bei is making his public debut at the National Zoo in Washington.

The cub, who was born Aug.

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22, is making his official debut Saturday, though zoo members have been able to see him since Jan. 8.

The cub is the third surviving offspring for parents Tian Tian and Mei Xiang, who also live at the zoo along with their second cub, Bao Bao, who was born in 2013. The couple's first surviving offspring, Tai Shan, lives in China.

A twin cub born the same day as Bei Bei died soon after birth.



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