Ceramics unearthed from Honduran site of fabled 'White City'

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras - U.S. and Honduran archaeologists have begun excavations at a mysterious site on Honduras' Caribbean coast that may be the near-mythical "White City" ruins.

See Full Article

Officials said Friday that excavation began Wednesday at the site, and have so far unearthed about five dozen ceramic fragments.

Also known as the "City of the Monkey God," the site is located in Honduras' jungle-covered Mosquito coastal region.

The dig is being carried out by archaeologists from Honduras' Institute of Anthropology and Colorado State University.

Institute Director Virgilio Paredes said the site did not appear to be Mayan, the culture that dominated other sites in the region.

Paredes said "it is a new culture, or a different culture."



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Vancouver could become 'mixed reality' hub: Microsoft president

    Tech & Science CTV News
    VANCOUVER -- Microsoft president Brad Smith says Vancouver could become a hub for "mixed reality" or virtual reality technology that merges with the physical world. Smith says the estimated revenue for mixed reality video games, including both hardware and software, is expected to top $12 billion by 2025. Source
  • Canada relatively unscathed as cyberattack continues to spread

    Tech & Science CBC News
    As a cyberattack continued to spread among nations and corporations on Wednesday, the identity and motives of the attackers remain a mystery. Ports, hospitals and banks around the globe have been hit by a version of ransomware being called ExPetr, similar to Petya but with a different functionality. Source
  • How artificial intelligence is taking on ransomware

    Tech & Science CTV News
    NEW YORK -- Twice in the space of six weeks, the world has suffered major attacks of ransomware -- malicious software that locks up photos and other files stored on your computer, then demands money to release them. Source
  • Petya vaccine is a ransomware fix, but 'not a silver bullet'

    Tech & Science CTV News
    A defence has been found against the so-called Petya virus attempting to cripple Microsoft Windows-based networks across the globe, although experts say it must be applied to each computer individually and will not kill the bug altogether. Source
  • Carcass of right whale being towed to P.E.I. to determine cause of death

    Tech & Science CTV News
    NORWAY, P.E.I. - The Canadian Coast Guard and Fisheries and Oceans hope to beach a dead right whale on a Prince Edward Island shore today in an effort to learn what has killed at least six of the endangered mammals in recent weeks. Source
  • Canada's top court backs order for Google to remove firm's website from global searches

    Tech & Science CBC News
    The Supreme Court of Canada has upheld a B.C. court ruling that ordered Google to remove the website of a company from its global search results. "The appeal is dismissed and the worldwide interlocutory injunction against Google is upheld," wrote the court in its decision issued Wednesday morning. Source
  • New made-in-China navy destroyer launches in Shanghai

    Tech & Science CTV News
    BEIJING -- China's increasingly powerful navy launched its most advanced domestically produced destroyer on Wednesday, at a time of rising competition with other naval powers such as the United States, Japan and India. The first 10,000-ton Type 055 entered the water at Shanghai's Jiangnan Shipyard on Wednesday morning, the navy said in a statement. Source
  • Increasingly wild weather could lead to rising air travel costs

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Be prepared to pay more for airfare if climate change continues to alter weather patterns, increasing the frequency and severity of storms, say climate change and airline industry experts. Daniel Scott, a climate professor at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, said travellers should also expect more flight delays and cancellations amid recurring snowstorms, thunderstorms and bouts of freezing rain. Source
  • Cambodian conservationists find rare cache of crocodile eggs

    Tech & Science CTV News
    PHNOM PENH, Cambodia - Wildlife researchers in Cambodia say they've found a clutch of eggs from one of the world's most endangered crocodiles, raising hopes of its continuing survival in the wild. The New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society said Wednesday that its researchers, along with Fisheries Administration employees and local residents, had found six eggs of the Siamese Crocodile in the southern province of Koh Kong as they were exploring for tracks, signs and dung of the…
  • Found in Cambodia: Clutch of eggs from one of the world's most endangered crocodiles

    Tech & Science CTV News
    PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- Wildlife researchers in Cambodia say they've found a clutch of eggs from one of the world's most endangered crocodiles, raising hopes of its continuing survival in the wild. The New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society said in a statement Wednesday that its researchers, along with Fisheries Administration employees and local residents, found six eggs of the Siamese Crocodile in Sre Ambel District in the southern province of Koh Kong as they were exploring for tracks,…