Latest Sony gadget sheds light on smart homes

Whether viewed as a bright idea or simply a gimmicky gadget, there is no denying that Sony has tried to think of everything with its latest smart home product.

See Full Article

The Sony Multifunctional Light is set to go on sale in Japan later this year and when it does it will be the smartest smart light available.

It can illuminate a room in any color of light available on the visible spectrum. It doesn't need a switch because its sensors know when someone's in the room. Those sensors can also track temperature, sound and humidity and pass on this information to other devices such as air conditioning and thermostat units.

And because it knows when someone walks in, it can turn the television on and then be used as a speaker system for enhancing the viewing experience.

But if that person is an uninvited guest, the overhead light doubles as a burglar alarm.

With the accompanying app it also serves as an intercom system for the entire home and for receiving voice commands regarding other gadgets under its control. It even has a microSD slot.

ABI Research says, in a report out this week, that over the course of 2016, the sales of individual smart home devices are set to double year-on-year and that by the end of the decade, many of us will already be paying for an entire smart home services package just as we currently do for internet connection or utilities.

"As the smart home functionality continues to push into new homes, vendors are benefiting from initial device and system revenues but the goal is to bring these sales into long-term recurring revenue services," says Jonathan Collins, Principal Analyst at ABI Research. "Managed smart home system pricing, like traditional home security services, is geared to win new consumers with reduced device and equipment sales in return for long-term recurring revenues."

The company notes that service providers are already taking established devices like Nest Thermostats or Philips Hue lights and bundling them as an integrated package.

If this trend continues, then a device like the Multifunctional Light or Amazon's Echo could soon be seen as the ideal unobtrusive hub for controlling such packages.

Whether or not ABI's forecast is accurate, Sony's smart light suggests that companies are increasingly looking beyond smartphones to other electronic outlets to channel their creativity.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Eugene Cernan, last astronaut to walk on moon, dead at 82

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Eugene Cernan, the last astronaut to walk on the moon, an experience that he said made him "belong to the universe," died on Monday at the age of 82, the U.S. space agency said. Cernan, who was also the second man to walk in space, died surrounded by his family, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said in a statement without providing details. Source
  • Text 911 for help? CRTC holds hearing on upgrading emergency services

    Tech & Science CBC News
    You may one day be able to text 911 for help, send a photo, or even share video of a bad guy fleeing a scene. The next generation of 911 services is the subject of a Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) hearing that started Monday. Source
  • Gene Cernan, last astronaut on the moon, dies at 82

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Former astronaut Gene Cernan, the last person to walk on the moon who returned to Earth with a message of "peace and hope for all mankind," died on Monday in Texas following ongoing heath issues, his family said. Source
  • Tecla Shield helps people with physical impairments use mobile devices

    Tech & Science Toronto Sun
    TORONTO — Mauricio Meza says the problem with using traditional assisted devices for communication is they're expensive and don't always work well. “The kind of device Stephen Hawking uses to communicate (costs) $10,000,” the CEO of Toronto tech start-up Komodo OpenLab Inc. Source
  • Why a Canadian teen joined American youth in suing U.S. over climate change

    Tech & Science CBC News
    All his life, Jacob Lebel has felt a special connection to the land, in rural Quebec where he was born and in Eugene, Ore., where he now lives and farms. Lebel, 19, is passionate about preserving the environment and doing what is necessary to prevent climate change. Source
  • Yukon home to 1st traces of humans in North America 24,000 years ago, research suggests

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Humans may have been living in Yukon's Bluefish Caves 10,000 years earlier than previously thought, new research from the University of Montreal suggests. If confirmed, this would make it the oldest known archeological site in North America, representing the earliest evidence found so far of humans in North America. Source
  • Chin up! Blue Monday is not the saddest day of the year

    Tech & Science CBC News
    A specialist in suicide prevention with Horizon Health says too much is made of Blue Monday, which popular culture suggests is the most depressing day of the year. By early January, references to Blue Monday were already popping up on social media, some as offers of support to people expecting to feel sad on the third Monday of January. Source
  • Academics work to preserve millions of colonial documents in Cuba

    Tech & Science CTV News
    HAVANA -- An American team of academics is racing to preserve millions of Cuban historical documents before they are lost to the elements and poor storage conditions. Many of the documents shed light on the slave trade, an integral part of Cuba's colonial history that was intertwined with that of the United States. Source
  • Text messages from the dead

    Tech & Science CBC News
    more stories from this episodeText messages from the deadVoicemail, we hardly knew yeThe apple that won't brownHow to make your city less brutal in the winterFull Episode by Danielle Nerman, CBC Calgary Religion, folklore and film are riddled with stories of the dead trying to communicate with the living. Source
  • Cutest captain: Sea lion caught in fishing gear hops on boat

    Tech & Science CTV News
    NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. -- Officials say a juvenile sea lion was so happy to be rescued after getting hooked by fishing gear off Southern California, it jumped into a Coast Guard boat. The Coast Guard says a Los Angeles-area crew on patrol pulled the sea lion free Saturday near Newport Harbor. Source