Conservationists welcome Hong Kong pledge to ban ivory trade

JOHANNESBURG - A pledge by Hong Kong to ban its ivory trade has been welcomed by conservationists who describe it as a key step toward curbing the slaughter of African elephants.

See Full Article

Hong Kong's leader, Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying, said in Hong Kong on Wednesday that the semiautonomous Chinese city will take steps to implement a total ban on the sale of ivory because of concern about poaching that has sharply reduced elephant populations in many parts of Africa.

Hong Kong will take legislative measures as soon as possible to ban the import and export of elephant hunting trophies and explore other legislation as part of its effort to phase out the local ivory trade, Leung said.

Moves to ban the trade by the government in Hong Kong, a major conduit for ivory bound for mainland China, would dovetail with similar pledges by Beijing. Hong Kong's Basic Law, a kind of mini-constitution, grants the city a high degree of control over its own affairs.

In a statement, Peter Knights, executive director of San Francisco-based WildAid, congratulated Hong Kong for what he called "this historic step."

The World Wide Fund for Nature also welcomed the pledge, urging the government to quickly develop a clear timetable for implementation.

China is the world's largest market for illegal ivory, which has been thriving under the cover of legal ivory sales. In September, U.S. President Barack Obama and President Xi Jinping of China agreed to implement nearly complete bans on the ivory trade.

In December, Save the Elephants, a conservation group, announced new research showing the price of illegal raw ivory in China had dropped by almost half in the previous 18 months. It attributed the drop to Chinese moves to end the trade, growing awareness in China about the link between buying ivory and the slaughter of elephants, and the Chinese economic slowdown.

The research authors, Esmond Bradley Martin and Lucy Vigne, also produced a report last year that said more than 90 per cent of ivory objects in Hong Kong, including rings, pendants and small figurines, are bought by mainland Chinese.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • How to take photos of the solar eclipse

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Photographing today’s solar eclipse requires a few extra steps, but is possible to do even with a smartphone. James Estrin, a senior staff photographer with the New York Times, recommends using a DSLR camera and a long lens, around 400 millimetres, to get a close up of the eclipse, but said that a smartphone will also be able to capture the moment. Source
  • Tech experts demanding 'killer robot' ban

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Tesla chief Elon Musk and Mustafa Suleyman, the co-founder of Google's DeepMind, are among more than 100 experts in artificial intelligence who are urging the United Nations to ban lethal autonomous weapons, known as “killer robots. Source
  • Quantum physics for babies — a different bedtime story

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Chris Ferrie writes books about rocket science for babies. The quantum theorist and alumnus of the Institute for Quantum Computing at the University of Waterloo describes himself as a "theorist by day, father by night." His latest publication Quantum Physics for Babies is the latest in his 'Baby University' series, and while the books don't guarantee a PhD, Ferrie says he's "just giving the seeds. Source
  • Guelph researcher turning 'Back to the Future' fuel into reality

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Professor Animesh Dutta has never seen the movie Back to The Future, but his latest project bears a striking resemblance to the film. The University of Guelph engineer is finding a way to turn food waste into fuel. Source
  • Americans stake out prime viewing spots to see sun go dark

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Americans with telescopes, cameras and protective glasses staked out viewing spots along a narrow corridor from Oregon to South Carolina to watch the moon blot out the midday sun Monday in what promised to be the most observed and photographed eclipse in history. Source
  • Moon begins blotting out the sun in historic eclipse

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Americans gazed in wonder through telescopes, cameras and protective glasses Monday as the moon began blotting out the midday sun in the first full-blown solar eclipse to sweep the U.S. from coast to coast in nearly a century. Source
  • Why a few drops of water make whisky taste better

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Ignore the snobs, because most experts agree: a few drops of water enhance the taste of whiskies, from well-rounded blends to peat bombs redolent of smoke, tobacco and leather. The only real question is, why is this true? Source
  • New Jersey shore amusement park recalls eclipse glasses

    Tech & Science CTV News
    POINT PLEASANT BEACH, N.J. -- A New Jersey shore amusement park is warning customers who bought special glasses to watch the solar eclipse to return them. Jenkinson's Boardwalk in Point Pleasant Beach announced on Facebook Sunday that EverythingBranded.com does not recommend using the glasses to view Monday's eclipse. Source
  • Rural Missouri set for influx of eclipse tourists in moment out of the sun

    Tech & Science CTV News
    ST. LOUIS -- Rural Missouri is preparing for its moment in the sun. Check that: Its moment out of the sun. A diagonal 482-kilometre-long, roughly 112-kilometres-wide stretch from St. Joseph to Cape Girardeau will be in the "path of totality" that will offer the best viewing of the total eclipse on Monday, the first in 99 years that will be visible coast-to-coast in the U.S. Source
  • China to relaunch one of the world's fastest bullet trains

    Tech & Science CTV News
    BEIJING -- After cutting back the speed of the Beijing to Shanghai bullet train following a deadly crash, China is set to again make it one of the world's fastest. New generation trains will service the route starting next month, making the 1,250-kilometre (777-mile) journey from the capital to Shanghai in just 4 hours, 30 minutes. Source