Grizzly killing report: Yellowstone hikers taking risks

BILLINGS, Mont. -- The killing of a Montana man by a Yellowstone National Park grizzly bear highlights the need for hikers in the region to travel in groups, carry Mace-like bear spray and take other precautions against attacks, investigators said Wednesday.

See Full Article

A 260-pound grizzly killed Lance Crosby, 63, in August as the Billings man hiked alone and off-trail in a popular area of the park known as Elephant Back Mountain.

Crosby's body was partially-eaten and buried. The female bear later was captured and euthanized and its two cubs placed into an Ohio zoo.

The attack marked the sixth fatal grizzly bear mauling since 2010 in the Yellowstone region of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho.

Five of the victims were hikers, including four who were alone, according to a multi-agency review board that investigated Crosby's death. None of the hikers carried canisters of bear spray, which can stop a charging bear.

"All of the agencies work really hard to get information out to people about how to be safe in bear country. The majority of people don't listen," said review board chair Chris Servheen, the grizzly bear recovery co-ordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Yellowstone received 4.1 million visits last year, the highest number on record.

Roughly 700 to 1,000 grizzlies live in and around the park. State officials want to allow hunts of the federally-protected animals in part to address increasingly frequent conflicts with people.

Since the 2011 mauling of a California man, park officials have attempted to step up bear safety education efforts.

In addition to new signs at trailheads that warn of the dangers of grizzlies, a park concessionaire recently began renting canisters of bear spray for $9.25 a day. That compares to a purchase price of about $50.

Yet surveys show most visitors aren't complying with recommended safety practices, said Yellowstone bear management biologist Kerry Gunther

Fewer than 14 per cent of almost 8,800 visitors surveyed carried bear spray, and 60 per cent hiked in party sizes smaller than the recommended minimum of three people.

Other recommended precautions include being vigilant, making noise, and not running from a bear during an encounter. The safety measures should be practiced in combination, officials said.

"You can't hike in a group and then not carry bear spray, or if you carry bear spray that doesn't make you immune. It's not brains in a can," Servheen said.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • First solar-powered gas station opens in Dubai

    Tech & Science CTV News
    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- A government oil company in the United Arab Emirates says it has opened the country's first solar-powered gas station in Dubai. The Dubai-owned Emirates National Oil Company said on Wednesday the service station on the city's main Sheikh Zayed Road thoroughfare is covered with solar panels that can generate up to 120 kilowatt hours. Source
  • Samsung's profit at 3-year high thanks to memory chips

    Tech & Science CTV News
    SEOUL, Korea, Republic Of -- Samsung Electronics said Thursday its first-quarter profit surged to the highest level in more than three years as its semiconductor division posted the highest income in the company's history. The South Korean company's January-March earnings jumped 46 per cent over a year earlier to 7.7 trillion won ($6.8 billion), compared with 5.3 trillion won a year earlier. Source
  • NASA's Cassini spacecraft flies between Saturn and rings in historic 1st

    Tech & Science CBC News
    NASA's Cassini spacecraft ventured Wednesday into the never-before-explored region between Saturn and its rings. But flight controllers won't know how everything went until Thursday when they are back in touch with the craft. Cassini was out of radio contact with Earth as it became the first spacecraft to enter the gap between Saturn and its rings. Source
  • Neanderthals in California? Maybe so, provocative story says

    Tech & Science CTV News
    NEW YORK -- A startling new report asserts that the first known Americans arrived much, much earlier than scientists thought -- more than 100,000 years ago ---- and maybe they were Neanderthals. If true, the finding would far surpass the widely accepted date of about 15,000 years ago. Source
  • Study suggests humans were in North America 100,000 years earlier than believed

    Tech & Science CBC News
    A team of scientists believe they have found evidence of human activity in North America that dates back 130,000 years — more than 100,000 years than earlier believed. The evidence comes from an archeological site in San Diego County, Calif. Source
  • Scientists find evidence that humans were in North America 100,000 years earlier than believed

    Tech & Science CBC News
    A team of scientists believe they have found evidence of human activity in North America that dates back 130,000 years — more than 100,000 years than earlier believed. The evidence comes from an archeological site in San Diego County, Calif. Source
  • Spacecraft flies between Saturn and rings in historic 1st

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA's Cassini spacecraft has ventured into the never-before-explored region between Saturn and its rings. But flight controllers won't know how everything went until Thursday when they are back in touch with the craft. Source
  • China's rare milu deer return in victory for conservation

    Tech & Science CTV News
    BEIJING -- The newborn fawn walks unsteadily among the trees that were once part of the Chinese emperor's hunting grounds, where more than a century before its forebears died out in their native China. This April marks the start of the birthing season for the milu deer, which has long been famed as having the head of a horse, the hooves of a cow, the tail of a donkey and the antlers of a deer. Source
  • China talking with European Space Agency about moon outpost

    Tech & Science CTV News
    BEIJING -- Representatives of China and the European Space Agency are discussing potential collaboration on a human outpost on the moon and other possible joint endeavours, according to a spokesman for the European agency and Chinese media reports. Source
  • Dolphin vaginas no longer a total mystery, thanks to Canadian scientist

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Dara Orbach is probably one of very few people in the world who regularly gets sent dolphin vaginas in the mail. "The boxes don't usually smell very good when they arrive," says Orbach, a post-doctoral fellow at Dalhousie University and a research assistant at Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts. Source