Grizzly killing report: Yellowstone hikers taking risks

BILLINGS, Mont. -- The killing of a Montana man by a Yellowstone National Park grizzly bear highlights the need for hikers in the region to travel in groups, carry Mace-like bear spray and take other precautions against attacks, investigators said Wednesday.

See Full Article

A 260-pound grizzly killed Lance Crosby, 63, in August as the Billings man hiked alone and off-trail in a popular area of the park known as Elephant Back Mountain.

Crosby's body was partially-eaten and buried. The female bear later was captured and euthanized and its two cubs placed into an Ohio zoo.

The attack marked the sixth fatal grizzly bear mauling since 2010 in the Yellowstone region of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho.

Five of the victims were hikers, including four who were alone, according to a multi-agency review board that investigated Crosby's death. None of the hikers carried canisters of bear spray, which can stop a charging bear.

"All of the agencies work really hard to get information out to people about how to be safe in bear country. The majority of people don't listen," said review board chair Chris Servheen, the grizzly bear recovery co-ordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Yellowstone received 4.1 million visits last year, the highest number on record.

Roughly 700 to 1,000 grizzlies live in and around the park. State officials want to allow hunts of the federally-protected animals in part to address increasingly frequent conflicts with people.

Since the 2011 mauling of a California man, park officials have attempted to step up bear safety education efforts.

In addition to new signs at trailheads that warn of the dangers of grizzlies, a park concessionaire recently began renting canisters of bear spray for $9.25 a day. That compares to a purchase price of about $50.

Yet surveys show most visitors aren't complying with recommended safety practices, said Yellowstone bear management biologist Kerry Gunther

Fewer than 14 per cent of almost 8,800 visitors surveyed carried bear spray, and 60 per cent hiked in party sizes smaller than the recommended minimum of three people.

Other recommended precautions include being vigilant, making noise, and not running from a bear during an encounter. The safety measures should be practiced in combination, officials said.

"You can't hike in a group and then not carry bear spray, or if you carry bear spray that doesn't make you immune. It's not brains in a can," Servheen said.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • SpaceX launches rocket with supplies to International Space Station

    Tech & Science CBC News
    A SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft was sent into space Sunday aboard a Falcon 9 rocket, on a mission to deliver supplies to the International Space Station. The launch was the first from Kennedy Space Center since the shuttles were retired six years ago. Source
  • SpaceX trying again to launch rocket from historic moon pad

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- SpaceX is taking another shot at launching a rocket from NASA's historic moon pad. As dawn broke Sunday over Florida's Kennedy Space Center, the unmanned Falcon rocket stood at Launch Complex 39A, poised to deliver supplies to the International Space Station. Source
  • SpaceX launches rocket from NASA's historic moon pad

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA's historic moonshot pad is back in business. A SpaceX Falcon rocket blasted off Sunday morning from Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39A. It's carrying a load of supplies for the International Space Station. Source
  • SpaceX go for launching rocket from NASA's historic moon pad

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- SpaceX is all set to launch a rocket from NASA's historic moon pad. As the sun rose Saturday over Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the unmanned Falcon rocket stood at Launch Complex 39A, ready to soar. Source
  • SpaceX set to launch rocket from NASA's historic moon pad

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- SpaceX is all set to launch a rocket from NASA's historic moon pad. As the sun rose Saturday over Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the unmanned Falcon rocket stood at Launch Complex 39A, ready to soar. Source
  • SpaceX halts rocket launch from NASA moon pad

    Tech & Science CTV News
    SpaceX will have to wait at least another day to launch from NASA's historic moon pad. Last-minute rocket trouble forced SpaceX to halt Saturday's countdown at Florida's Kennedy Space Center. The unmanned Falcon rocket remains at Launch Complex 39A, waiting to soar on a space station delivery mission. Source
  • Last-second launch delay for SpaceX at historic moon pad

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Last-minute rocket trouble forced SpaceX on Saturday to delay its inaugural launch from NASA's historic moon pad. SpaceX halted the countdown with just 13 seconds remaining. The problem with the second-stage thrust control actually cropped up several minutes earlier. Source
  • Abundant fish draw 1 million penguins to Argentine peninsula

    Tech & Science CTV News
    PUNTA TOMBO, Argentina -- More than a million penguins have travelled to Argentina's Punta Tombo peninsula during this year's breeding season, drawn by an unusual abundance of small fish. Local officials say that's a record number in recent years for the world's largest colony of Magellanic penguins, offering an especially stunning spectacle for the tens of thousands of people who visit the reserve annually. Source
  • Biologists find weird cave life that may be 50,000 years old

    Tech & Science CTV News
    BOSTON -- Scientists examining caves in Mexico have found life trapped in crystals that could be 50,000 years old. Penelope Boston, head of NASA's Astrobiology Institute, on Friday announced the findings of bizarre and ancient microbes in caves in Nica, Mexico. Source
  • Citizen Science: You could find Planet 9

    Tech & Science CBC News
    This is your chance to enter the history books as the discoverer of a ninth planet that astronomers believe is hiding in the outer reaches of our solar system. A space telescope has scanned the skies and may have already seen it, but finding it in the huge data set is proving difficult. Source