'Intelligent' self-cleaning toilet eliminates need for toilet paper

LAS VEGAS -- The demo high-tech toilets from Japan are unabashedly right in the middle of the floor at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

See Full Article

While the toilets are not functioning ones, manufacturer Toto is keen to show how its "intelligent" washlet system can be good for the environment and improve people's experience in the bathroom.

How smart is the toilet?

"You walk up to it and it opens up, and when you leave it closes and flushes automatically," Toto spokeswoman Lenora Campos said.

It also eliminates the need for toilet paper.

"It scans and delivers warm aerated water" to the user, she said. "It washes and then dries you. We can be clean without paper products."

After usage, the toilet cleans and sanitizes itself with electrolyzed water. And because of its coating of titanium dioxide and zirconium, nothing sticks to the bowl.

That means it can go for a year without cleaning, avoiding the use of environmentally harmful chemicals, Toto says.

None of this is new to many Japanese or visitors to the country -- Campos said about 70 percent of Japanese homes use this kind of washlet system, but that the idea is gaining ground in other countries.

Toto has been selling the Neorest model in the U.S. and Europe and at in Las Vegas introduced a newer version -- a wall-hung toilet which takes up less space with its tank and drain in the wall, and is even more water-efficient.

This new model is being introduced in Europe this year with plans for the U.S. market in 2017.

One thing that may be hard to digest for users is the price: a list price of $10,000 for the original Neorest, and possibly more for the new model.

Toto USA president William Strang said its customers are the best promoters of the intelligent toilet.

"Once they test-drive this, they don't want to go back," he said.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Pokemon Go one-year anniversary party goes awry in Chicago

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CHICAGO -- A Pokemon Go festival at Chicago's Grant Part to celebrate the virtual game's one-year anniversary went awry when a technical glitch prevented many players from logging on. The Chicago Tribune reported the festival's organizers decided to issue refunds for the $20 tickets and $100 in credits for use on the app. Source
  • Common genetic trait links human and doggy friendliness

    Tech & Science CBC News
    We may be more like our dogs than we know. Scientists studying the genetic basis for dog friendliness have found it comes from a portion of their genome that is similar to the area in the human genome that relates to sociability. Source
  • Man says he punched grizzly bear in the nose in B.C.

    Tech & Science CTV News
    QUALICUM BEACH, B.C. - A British Columbia man's beachcombing trip turned into a harrowing fight for survival as a grizzly bear flailed him around "like a puppet." Fifty-seven-year-old Randal Warnock says he had been walking on the beach on Brown Island on B.C. Source
  • 'Mystery' signal from space is solved; it's not aliens

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Astronomers have finally solved the mystery of peculiar signals coming from a nearby star, a story that sparked intense public speculation this week that perhaps, finally, alien life had been found. It hasn't. The signal, which has been formally named "Weird!" was interference from a distant satellite. Source
  • Possible melted fuel seen for first time at Fukushima plant

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TOKYO -- An underwater robot captured images of solidified lava-like rocks Friday inside a damaged reactor at Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, spotting for the first time what is believed to be nuclear fuel that melted six years ago. Source
  • Robot finds likely melted fuel heap inside Fukushima reactor

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TOKYO - An underwater robot has captured images of massive deposits believed to be melted nuclear fuel that are covering the floor of a damaged reactor at Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant. Plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. Source
  • North Atlantic right whale to be examined on N.B. island

    Tech & Science CTV News
    MISCOU ISLAND, N.B. -- Marine mammal experts will examine another North Atlantic right whale today after it was found dead in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The federal Fisheries Department says the necropsy is being conducted near the Miscou Island Lighthouse on the northern tip of Miscou Island, N.B. Source
  • Elephant seals have rhythm and they know how to use it

    Tech & Science CBC News
    New research published in the journal Current Biology finds that elephant seals identify one another by the rhythm in their calls, much the way humans can discern accents and vocal tone. Previously there was no recorded example of a non-human mammal that could remember and recognize a wide range of rhythms. Source
  • Moon dust collected by Neil Armstrong sold for $1.8 million

    Tech & Science CTV News
    NEW YORK -- A bag containing traces of moon dust sold for $1.8 million at an auction on Thursday following a galactic court battle. The collection bag, used by astronaut Neil Armstrong during the first manned mission to the moon in 1969, was sold at a Sotheby’s auction of items related to space voyages. Source
  • Moon dust collected by Neil Armstrong sold for US$1.8 million

    Tech & Science CTV News
    NEW YORK -- A bag containing traces of moon dust sold for $1.8 million at an auction on Thursday following a galactic court battle. The collection bag, used by astronaut Neil Armstrong during the first manned mission to the moon in 1969, was sold at a Sotheby’s auction of items related to space voyages. Source