Rare galaxy with 2 black holes has 1 starved of stars

KISSIMMEE, Fla. -- An astrophysicist has discovered something even rarer than a double-black hole galaxy: a skinny black hole.

The University of Colorado's Julie Comerford reported her findings Tuesday at the American Astronomical Society's annual meeting in Kissimmee, Florida.

See Full Article

Comerford says only 12 galaxies are known to exist with two black holes in their midst. Normally galaxies have a single supermassive black hole at the centre.

But in this newly identified galaxy about 1 billion light-years away, one of the two black holes is smaller than the other and apparently starved of stars.

Comerford speculates the slim black hole either lost mass in the collision of two galaxies that merged into this one -- a crash diet. Or it's a rare example of an intermediate-sized black hole that will grow.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Russian rocket stage with toxic fuel to fall in Canadian Arctic

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Another Russian rocket stage likely to be holding highly toxic fuel is slated to splash down in environmentally sensitive waters of the Canadian Arctic on Wednesday. Documents on the website of the European Space Agency say the Cold-War-era missile repurposed for satellites is to lift off from a Russian launching pad. Source
  • U.S. appeals court rejects copyright suit over monkey selfies

    Tech & Science CTV News
    SAN FRANCISCO -- U.S. copyright law does not allow lawsuits claiming animals have copyrights to photographs, a U.S. appeals court ruled Monday in a case over selfies taken by a monkey. The decision by the 9th U.S. Source
  • Shipwreck found in Lake Erie could be nearly 200 years old

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TOLEDO, Ohio -- Shipwreck hunters are planning to excavate around a Lake Erie wreck this summer that they think could be the remains of a schooner that went down nearly two centuries ago. Its size, design and location point toward it being a sailing ship called the Lake Serpent, which sunk in 1829, the National Museum of the Great Lakes said Monday. Source
  • Census finds increase in Mekong River's Irrawaddy dolphins

    Tech & Science CTV News
    PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- The number of critically endangered Irrawaddy dolphins along a stretch of the Mekong River has increased for the first time in 20 years but the animals still face serious threats, Cambodia's government and a major conservation group said Monday. Source
  • New U.S. net neutrality rules come into effect today

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Net neutrality in the United States is officially over, as of today. In December, the Federal Communications Commission voted to change Obama-era rules that governed how major telecommunications companies treat data over the internet. That ruling comes into effect as of this morning. Source
  • Bloomberg gives $4.5M to UN climate body, softening U.S. cuts

    Tech & Science CTV News
    BERLIN -- Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is donating $4.5 million to the United Nations body that oversees climate change negotiations. Bloomberg, who has long championed the fight against global warming, will make up the shortfall in the agency's budget caused by U.S. Source
  • Police try to unlock phone with dead man's finger at funeral home

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Florida authorities went to a funeral home and used a dead man's finger to try to unlock his cellphone as part of their investigation. Thirty-year-old Linus Phillip was killed by a Largo police officer last month after authorities say he tried to drive away before an officer could search him. Source
  • How patio furniture and fence posts might solve N.S.'s plastic recycling woes

    Tech & Science CBC News
    A Halifax-area company says it has a made-in-Nova Scotia solution to the challenge of recycling plastics — turn shopping bags into fence posts and patio furniture. Municipalities across the province have scrambled to find new markets for recycled plastic after China stopped accepting the material last year. Source
  • 'Every plant and animal is useful to us': Indigenous professor re-thinking how we deal with invasive species

    Tech & Science CBC News
    When invasive species show up, Western science tells us they should be dealt with. But Nicholas Reo wonders whether we should instead ask why they're here in the first place. Reo, an anthropology professor at Dartmouth College, researches how invasive species mitigation could be approached differently — and as a citizen of the Sault Ste. Source
  • Police try to unlock phone with dead man's finger in Florida

    Tech & Science CTV News
    LARGO, Fla. - Florida authorities went to a funeral home and used a dead man's finger to try to unlock his cellphone as part of their investigation. Thirty-year-old Linus Phillip was killed by a Largo police officer last month after authorities say he tried to drive away before an officer could search him. Source