Smarter devices, Ultra High Definition TVs expected at CES

With the 2016 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) due to open this week, connected devices and Ultra High Definition (UHD) displays are hotly awaited at the show, which runs from Jan.

See Full Article

6 to Jan. 9 in Las Vegas.

Stars of the show: connected devices

It's no real surprise that the Internet of Things is likely to see a wealth of new arrivals at this year's Las Vegas consumer tech show. Smartwatches should, for example, be set to make headlines once again, as manufacturers like Pebble, LG and Samsung could be set to present new generation models. FitBit and other fitness-tracker makers may showcase new devices too.

As well as all kinds of smart objects (all with varying degrees of "smartness"), Virtual Reality (VR) is likely to be a hot topic at this year's CES, notably embodied by the first VR headsets. Oculus, HTC, Samsung, and Sony may all be poised to unveil their latest innovations in the field. Microsoft could even give a new demo of its HoloLens headset, as seen at an October 2015 press conference with a hologram-based fighting game.

UHD & flexible displays

After seeing the first curved OLED displays presented in 2013 and 8K TVs demoed in 2014, spectacular developments are once again awaited in the TV sector. This year, 8K technology is expected to be present in a bigger way, with more manufacturers set to preview models at CES 2016, even though no content is yet available in this format.

Given the string of new devices released in autumn and winter 2015, and with the Mobile World Congress due to be held in Barcelona, Spain at the end of February 2016, there's little chance that any major new smartphones will be unveiled at CES. However, some major innovations could still be showcased, such as the first entirely foldable smartphone, currently under development at Samsung. Although theoretically destined for the Asian market, it might be presented at the Las Vegas event if finished in time.

Like every year, CES 2016 has a busy conference schedule, featuring prominent guests such as Won Pyo Hong (Samsung), Brian Krzanich (Intel), Ginni Rometty (IBM), Reed Hastings (Netflix), and Robert Kyncl (YouTube). The future of the connected car will be presented by guests including Mary Barra (General Motors) and Herbert Diess (Volkswagen).

A total of over 3,600 exhibitors from all over the world will be heading to Las Vegas for CES 2016.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Tiger and goat cohabitate in Russian park

    Tech & Science CTV News
    MOSCOW -- A neglectful mother whose partner's unusual lifestyle became a sensation has taken over her mate's home with an odd companion of her own. This isn't lurid reality TV. It's tigers and goats in Russia's Far East. Source
  • Pokemon Go one-year anniversary party goes awry in Chicago

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CHICAGO -- A Pokemon Go festival at Chicago's Grant Part to celebrate the virtual game's one-year anniversary went awry when a technical glitch prevented many players from logging on. The Chicago Tribune reported the festival's organizers decided to issue refunds for the $20 tickets and $100 in credits for use on the app. Source
  • Common genetic trait links human and doggy friendliness

    Tech & Science CBC News
    We may be more like our dogs than we know. Scientists studying the genetic basis for dog friendliness have found it comes from a portion of their genome that is similar to the area in the human genome that relates to sociability. Source
  • Man says he punched grizzly bear in the nose in B.C.

    Tech & Science CTV News
    QUALICUM BEACH, B.C. - A British Columbia man's beachcombing trip turned into a harrowing fight for survival as a grizzly bear flailed him around "like a puppet." Fifty-seven-year-old Randal Warnock says he had been walking on the beach on Brown Island on B.C. Source
  • 'Mystery' signal from space is solved; it's not aliens

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Astronomers have finally solved the mystery of peculiar signals coming from a nearby star, a story that sparked intense public speculation this week that perhaps, finally, alien life had been found. It hasn't. The signal, which has been formally named "Weird!" was interference from a distant satellite. Source
  • Possible melted fuel seen for first time at Fukushima plant

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TOKYO -- An underwater robot captured images of solidified lava-like rocks Friday inside a damaged reactor at Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, spotting for the first time what is believed to be nuclear fuel that melted six years ago. Source
  • Robot finds likely melted fuel heap inside Fukushima reactor

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TOKYO - An underwater robot has captured images of massive deposits believed to be melted nuclear fuel that are covering the floor of a damaged reactor at Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant. Plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. Source
  • North Atlantic right whale to be examined on N.B. island

    Tech & Science CTV News
    MISCOU ISLAND, N.B. -- Marine mammal experts will examine another North Atlantic right whale today after it was found dead in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The federal Fisheries Department says the necropsy is being conducted near the Miscou Island Lighthouse on the northern tip of Miscou Island, N.B. Source
  • Elephant seals have rhythm and they know how to use it

    Tech & Science CBC News
    New research published in the journal Current Biology finds that elephant seals identify one another by the rhythm in their calls, much the way humans can discern accents and vocal tone. Previously there was no recorded example of a non-human mammal that could remember and recognize a wide range of rhythms. Source
  • Moon dust collected by Neil Armstrong sold for $1.8 million

    Tech & Science CTV News
    NEW YORK -- A bag containing traces of moon dust sold for $1.8 million at an auction on Thursday following a galactic court battle. The collection bag, used by astronaut Neil Armstrong during the first manned mission to the moon in 1969, was sold at a Sotheby’s auction of items related to space voyages. Source