Elephant seal that caused traffic jam in California gives birth

SAN FRANCISCO - The 225-kilogram elephant seal that tied up traffic in Northern California last week has given birth.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports Monday that the birth happened Saturday, five days after the elephant seal first tried to cross a busy highway near Sears Point in Sonoma County.

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Rescue crews last Wednesday tranquilized the wayward seal that snarled traffic for two days by trying to cross a highway several times.

The wandering seal appeared healthy and fit, but experts thought she might be pregnant.

Before the seal was tranquilized, a rescue worker in a kayak used a bullhorn to yell at the animal and try to scare her back into open water. The effort failed.

She was not injured.

Officials said they have no idea why the seal was determined to get away from the bay.



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