Meet two Calgary pups trained to track down bed bugs

They’re a tiny, blood-sucking souvenir no one wants to bring home from vacation: bed bugs.

They can live in furniture, mattresses and electrical outlets, hiding away in homes and hotels, undetected until it’s too late.

See Full Article

Bed bugs emerge from their hiding spots at night to feed, and leave tiny red bites on the skin of their victims.

But if you’re worried you might have an infestation on your hands, you could always hire a pair of adorable detectives to search your space.

Turbo, a four-year-old Belgian Malinois, and Mambo, a German Shepherd, both have a nose for bed bugs. And if you contact Teena Wilson, her four-legged friends can come track down the six-legged nuisances.

“Every city and every town has had an experience with bed bugs,” says Wilson, who owns Night Night Sleep Tight: K9 Detection Services in Calgary. “Everybody gets creeped out with them.”

Bed bug dog

Wilson first trains the dogs to find bed bug-scented strips before moving on to the real thing.

“The scent strip itself is saturated with a solution that’s made of bed bugs,” she says. “Bed bugs feed on only one thing, which is blood, and so a dog can smell blood.”

Though Wilson isn’t an exterminator, her service can provide early detection – because once a place is infested, removal can cost thousands of dollars.

It’s one way to make sure a relaxing vacation doesn’t become an extended hassle.

“I go over people's luggage quite a bit now,” Wilson says. “The dogs bring extreme peace of mind.

With a report from CTV National News Alberta Bureau Chief Janet Dirks



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Why NASA is freezing the Hubble Space Telescope' s successor ahead of 2018 launch

    Tech & Science CTV News
    The super-sized successor to NASA’s legendary Hubble Space Telescope is more than a year away from deploying its massive two-storey tall, gold-plated mirrors in the harshness of deep space. That’s why scientists are busy freezing the US$9 billion, 6,200 kilogram spacecraft to see if they can break it here on Earth. Source
  • Snooty, oldest Florida manatee in captivity, dies at 69

    Tech & Science CTV News
    BRADENTON, Fla. -- Snooty, Florida's longest living manatee in captivity, has died one day after a huge party to celebrate his 69th birthday. The South Florida Museum posted a Facebook message Sunday saying that the beloved manatee had died in a heartbreaking accident. Source
  • Tiger and goat cohabitate in Russian park

    Tech & Science CTV News
    MOSCOW -- A neglectful mother whose partner's unusual lifestyle became a sensation has taken over her mate's home with an odd companion of her own. This isn't lurid reality TV. It's tigers and goats in Russia's Far East. Source
  • Pokemon Go one-year anniversary party goes awry in Chicago

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CHICAGO -- A Pokemon Go festival at Chicago's Grant Part to celebrate the virtual game's one-year anniversary went awry when a technical glitch prevented many players from logging on. The Chicago Tribune reported the festival's organizers decided to issue refunds for the $20 tickets and $100 in credits for use on the app. Source
  • Common genetic trait links human and doggy friendliness

    Tech & Science CBC News
    We may be more like our dogs than we know. Scientists studying the genetic basis for dog friendliness have found it comes from a portion of their genome that is similar to the area in the human genome that relates to sociability. Source
  • Man says he punched grizzly bear in the nose in B.C.

    Tech & Science CTV News
    QUALICUM BEACH, B.C. - A British Columbia man's beachcombing trip turned into a harrowing fight for survival as a grizzly bear flailed him around "like a puppet." Fifty-seven-year-old Randal Warnock says he had been walking on the beach on Brown Island on B.C. Source
  • 'Mystery' signal from space is solved; it's not aliens

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Astronomers have finally solved the mystery of peculiar signals coming from a nearby star, a story that sparked intense public speculation this week that perhaps, finally, alien life had been found. It hasn't. The signal, which has been formally named "Weird!" was interference from a distant satellite. Source
  • Possible melted fuel seen for first time at Fukushima plant

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TOKYO -- An underwater robot captured images of solidified lava-like rocks Friday inside a damaged reactor at Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, spotting for the first time what is believed to be nuclear fuel that melted six years ago. Source
  • Robot finds likely melted fuel heap inside Fukushima reactor

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TOKYO - An underwater robot has captured images of massive deposits believed to be melted nuclear fuel that are covering the floor of a damaged reactor at Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant. Plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. Source
  • North Atlantic right whale to be examined on N.B. island

    Tech & Science CTV News
    MISCOU ISLAND, N.B. -- Marine mammal experts will examine another North Atlantic right whale today after it was found dead in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The federal Fisheries Department says the necropsy is being conducted near the Miscou Island Lighthouse on the northern tip of Miscou Island, N.B. Source