WhatsApp overloaded, connection spotty on New Year's Eve

NEW YORK -- They're not ignoring you, it's just WhatsApp.

The popular messaging service owned by Facebook was intermittently unavailable for several hours Thursday, delaying New Year's Eve messages for some users.

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Facebook says WhatsApp has about 900 million global users.

Facebook Inc. did not immediately answer questions about the cause of the outage or if service had been fully restored.

The social network also had a glitch on its flagship service Thursday that invited some users to celebrate "46 years of friendship on Facebook" with one or more of their online friends.


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