More than a dozen prominent New York City hotels pledge to cut emissions

NEW YORK - More than a dozen of New York City's most famed hotels are pledging to get greener.

The Waldorf-Astoria New York, the Lotte New York Palace, the Pierre-A Taj Hotel and the Crowne Plaza Times Square are among the 16 city hotels - all currently thronged with tourists visiting New York for the holidays - whose owners have agreed to cut greenhouse gases from their buildings by 30 per cent or more in the next decade.

See Full Article

Mayor Bill de Blasio's office is spearheading the NYC Carbon Challenge program, and will announce the hotels' commitment on Tuesday, his aides told The Associated Press on Monday.

"If some of New York's most iconic hotels can significantly reduce their carbon footprint, anyone can," the mayor said in a statement.

New York is one of the nation's leading tourist attractions - 56.5 million people visited in 2014 - and administration officials believe the famed hotels are a powerful billboard for the mayor's environmental program. The so-called Carbon Challenge is part of City Hall's ambitious plan to reduce all citywide greenhouse gases 80 per cent by 2050.

The expansion to the 16 hotels - which also include the Grand Hyatt New York, the Westin New York at Times Square and The Peninsula New York among others - is estimated to reduce emissions by 32,000 metric tons and result in an estimated $25 million in energy cost savings. Environmental advocates largely praised the move, suggesting that enlisting a few high-profile structures to the cause could spur others to join.

"As the nation's number one big city destination, the hotels are showing the rest of the world that our city is committed to reducing our carbon emissions and fighting climate change," said Herve Houdre, general manager of the InterContinental New York Barclay.

City officials said that more than 17 universities, 11 hospitals and nearly 20 residential property management companies - combining for nearly 7 per cent of citywide building-based emissions - have already signed on to the mayor's program. Officials estimate that the program overall will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 515,000 metric tons - the equivalent of taking 100,000 cars off the roads.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • First solar-powered gas station opens in Dubai

    Tech & Science CTV News
    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- A government oil company in the United Arab Emirates says it has opened the country's first solar-powered gas station in Dubai. The Dubai-owned Emirates National Oil Company said on Wednesday the service station on the city's main Sheikh Zayed Road thoroughfare is covered with solar panels that can generate up to 120 kilowatt hours. Source
  • Samsung's profit at 3-year high thanks to memory chips

    Tech & Science CTV News
    SEOUL, Korea, Republic Of -- Samsung Electronics said Thursday its first-quarter profit surged to the highest level in more than three years as its semiconductor division posted the highest income in the company's history. The South Korean company's January-March earnings jumped 46 per cent over a year earlier to 7.7 trillion won ($6.8 billion), compared with 5.3 trillion won a year earlier. Source
  • NASA's Cassini spacecraft flies between Saturn and rings in historic 1st

    Tech & Science CBC News
    NASA's Cassini spacecraft ventured Wednesday into the never-before-explored region between Saturn and its rings. But flight controllers won't know how everything went until Thursday when they are back in touch with the craft. Cassini was out of radio contact with Earth as it became the first spacecraft to enter the gap between Saturn and its rings. Source
  • Neanderthals in California? Maybe so, provocative story says

    Tech & Science CTV News
    NEW YORK -- A startling new report asserts that the first known Americans arrived much, much earlier than scientists thought -- more than 100,000 years ago ---- and maybe they were Neanderthals. If true, the finding would far surpass the widely accepted date of about 15,000 years ago. Source
  • Study suggests humans were in North America 100,000 years earlier than believed

    Tech & Science CBC News
    A team of scientists believe they have found evidence of human activity in North America that dates back 130,000 years — more than 100,000 years than earlier believed. The evidence comes from an archeological site in San Diego County, Calif. Source
  • Scientists find evidence that humans were in North America 100,000 years earlier than believed

    Tech & Science CBC News
    A team of scientists believe they have found evidence of human activity in North America that dates back 130,000 years — more than 100,000 years than earlier believed. The evidence comes from an archeological site in San Diego County, Calif. Source
  • Spacecraft flies between Saturn and rings in historic 1st

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA's Cassini spacecraft has ventured into the never-before-explored region between Saturn and its rings. But flight controllers won't know how everything went until Thursday when they are back in touch with the craft. Source
  • China's rare milu deer return in victory for conservation

    Tech & Science CTV News
    BEIJING -- The newborn fawn walks unsteadily among the trees that were once part of the Chinese emperor's hunting grounds, where more than a century before its forebears died out in their native China. This April marks the start of the birthing season for the milu deer, which has long been famed as having the head of a horse, the hooves of a cow, the tail of a donkey and the antlers of a deer. Source
  • China talking with European Space Agency about moon outpost

    Tech & Science CTV News
    BEIJING -- Representatives of China and the European Space Agency are discussing potential collaboration on a human outpost on the moon and other possible joint endeavours, according to a spokesman for the European agency and Chinese media reports. Source
  • Dolphin vaginas no longer a total mystery, thanks to Canadian scientist

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Dara Orbach is probably one of very few people in the world who regularly gets sent dolphin vaginas in the mail. "The boxes don't usually smell very good when they arrive," says Orbach, a post-doctoral fellow at Dalhousie University and a research assistant at Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts. Source