Reports suggest Google is offering an alternative to passwords

Google is testing an identification system which does not require a password, according to leaks reported by Reddit and backed up by the Android Police website.

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This new feature, which is in the test phase, is based on the idea of notification. Rather than entering a password, Google account holders sign in via a notification received on their smartphone which enables them to log in.

While this method could prove to take a little longer than entering a password, its aim is to improve security. At any time, users can reverse their decision and sign in using a password, for example when there is no network.

Google is not the only major operator to offer an alternative to the traditional password.

Yahoo!, for example, offers its Key Account system via the latest update to its Yahoo Mail app for mobile. This system also involves sending a notification to a smartphone via the owner's email address when they want to open their mailbox from any device. All users have to do is click on "yes" on their smartphone to confirm they want to access the mailbox, without having to remember their password.

Other operators prefer to use biometry, as Microsoft does with Windows 10 via two recognition systems, Hello (signing into the operating system and unlocking devices without a password) and Passport (for apps). The idea is not to have to store passwords on external servers which can be hacked at any time.

Using passwords is a potential security weakness, particularly given that the favorites are still "123456", "password" and "qwerty", according to SplashData.



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