Apple, Ericsson sign deal to jointly develop 5G phones

HELSINKI -- Swedish telecoms firm Ericsson AB has inked a 7-year deal with Apple Inc. that brings an end to outstanding mutual patent litigations between the two and paves the way for their joint-development of the next generation of super-fast phones.

See Full Article

Ericsson, the world's largest wireless equipment maker, did not reveal terms of the deal Monday but said it includes a cross-license that covers patents owned by both companies, including the GSM, UMTS and LTE standards used in mobile technology. It made a similar agreement with the world's largest smartphone maker, South Korea's Samsung, last year.

Apple, the No. 2 smartphone maker with a 13 per cent global market share according to research firm Gartner, will make an initial payment to Ericsson, followed by royalties.

Though the monetary sums involved were not disclosed, investors liked what they were hearing and Ericsson's share price ended 3 per cent higher at 80.95 kronor in Stockholm.

The deal is somewhat of a turnaround. In February, Ericsson filed complaints on 41 patents for technology used in iPhones and iPads after Apple declined to renew a licensing agreement for Ericsson's mobile technology, saying the Swedish provider was asking for too much money.

Monday's agreement comes in an industry riddled with litigation over patents -- companies sue each other for alleged copying appearances of products, with one study finding more than 250,000 patents in a smartphone.

In the latest round of a long-running fight between Samsung and Apple, the South Korean company has appealed a $399 million judgment for illegally copying patented aspects of the look of Apple's iPhone to the U.S. Supreme Court. The court could decide early next year whether to hear the case, but arguments would not take place before the fall of 2016.

Ericsson said its deal with Apple means co-operating on the development of fifth generation, or 5G, as well as on video and wireless networks.

Although it gave no precise amounts, Ericsson said it expects revenues this year of some $1.4 billion this year, which includes "the positive effects" of the settlement and income from other licensees.

No one at California-based Apple was immediately available for comment.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Windows update will bring 3D, game tools and less clutter

    Tech & Science CTV News
    NEW YORK -- A major update to Microsoft's Windows 10 system will start reaching consumers and businesses on April 11, offering 3-D drawing tools, game-broadcasting capabilities and better ways to manage your web browsing. This "Creators Update" also aims to make future updates less disruptive. Source
  • Samsung's Galaxy S8 phone aims to dispel the Note 7 debacle

    Tech & Science CTV News
    NEW YORK -- Samsung seems to be playing it safe with its first major smartphone since the embarrassing recall of its fire-prone Note 7. The Galaxy S8 features a larger display than its predecessor, the Galaxy S7, and sports a voice assistant intended to rival Siri and Google Assistant. Source
  • How North Korea hides massive nuclear bomb tests

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TOKYO -- Let's say you're North Korea and you have this nuclear device you really want to test. And let's say you'd rather some of the more sensitive details remain private. Physicists, geologists, imagery analysts, some of the best militaries in the world, monitoring posts set up by non-proliferation organizations -- beating the technology arrayed against you will be no mean feat. Source
  • The argument for robot 'personhood'

    Tech & Science CBC News
    What are the rights of a robot? Does it have any? Should it? It's a question few of us have given much thought to, outside of a Friday night curled up in front of a science fiction movie. Source
  • Netherlands town installs traffic lights for pedestrians walking and texting

    Tech & Science CBC News
    It's dubbed "wexting" — walking while texting. So-called distracted walking can certainly be annoying, and some argue it's a public safety hazard. Now, a small town in the Netherlands is testing a novel approach to address those safety concerns. Source
  • Samsung tries to win back customers with Galaxy S8 smartphone

    Tech & Science CBC News
    ??After the damaging recall of its fire-prone Note 7 smartphone, you could be forgiven for thinking Samsung Electronics would make a song and dance about battery safety in its new flagship phones, due to be launched in the U.S. Source
  • 'Unreal when it targets you': Faceless trolls attack online

    Tech & Science CTV News
    One morning near the end of her long-shot congressional campaign, 25-year-old Erin Schrode rolled over in bed, reflexively checked her cellphone -- and burst into tears. With mounting horror, she scanned a barrage of anti-Semitic emails from anonymous trolls. Source
  • Changing jet stream, extreme weather linked to humans: study

    Tech & Science CBC News
    From the heat and drought that led to explosive fire conditions in Fort McMurray to non-stop rain before the disastrous Calgary flooding — these are perfect examples of how too many days of any kind of weather can lead to catastrophic extremes. Source
  • U.S. lawmakers vote to allow internet providers to sell customers' browsing data

    Tech & Science CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- The House voted Tuesday to block online privacy regulations issued during the final months of the Obama administration, a first step toward allowing internet providers such as Comcast, AT&T and Verizon to sell the browsing habits of their customers. Source
  • Supermassive black holes give birth to stars, astronomers discover

    Tech & Science CBC News
    A team of astrophysicists has discovered that supermassive black holes at the centre of galaxies aren't just destroyers of stars, but can also be their creators. Stellar black holes form from the collapse of a large star. Source