Caribou conservation works better when First Nations involved: study

EDMONTON - A study suggests that if Canada is serious about reconciliation with First Nations, giving them a greater voice in caribou conservation might be a good place to start.

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The study released today by the Boreal Leadership Council concludes that including indigenous people makes a big difference to conservation programs.

It suggests that bringing First Nations on board results in earlier and better information and more flexibility in adjusting programs.

Report author Valerie Courtois says the cultural value of caribou could make the animals a powerful way to bring indigenous and mainstream society together.

The Boreal Leadership Council is made up of First Nations, business leaders and environmental groups.



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