Annual report notes record warmth, retreating ice in Arctic

NEW YORK -- The warming Arctic has set another record.

The average air temperature over Arctic land reached 2.3 degrees F (1.3 degrees C) above average for the year ending in September.

See Full Article

That's the highest since observations began in 1900.

The new mark was noted in the annual Arctic Report Card, released Tuesday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The Arctic centres on the North Pole and reaches into North America and Eurasia.

"Warming is happening more than twice as fast in the Arctic than anywhere else in the world. We know this is due to climate change," NOAA chief scientist Rick Spinrad told reporters in San Francisco at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union.

Another record emerged for sea ice, which appears when Arctic Ocean water freezes. When it reached its peak coverage in February, it was the lowest maximum extent since records began in 1979. The minimum ice coverage, reached in September, was the fourth lowest on record.

The retreat of sea ice is considered a threat to animals like walruses, which use it for mating, giving birth and getting out of the water.

Walruses can use land instead to leave the water, but they are crowding onto beaches where a stampede can be devastating for calves, two editors of the report card told AP.

Walruses have been hauling themselves out on land in northwest Alaska, a recent phenomenon, Martin Jeffries of the federal Office of Naval Research and Jackie Richter-Menge of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers wrote in a joint email.

Snow cover in June in both the North American and Eurasian parts of the Arctic was at the second lowest level since records began in 1967. Reduced snow cover lets more sunlight through to the land, which absorbs the energy and gets warmer. Since 1979, the extent of June snow cover has been dropping by 18 per cent per decade, the study said.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • New research suggests winds of change blow even for black holes

    Tech & Science CTV News
    EDMONTON -- The winds of change blow, even around a black hole. New Canadian-led research has peered into the strange world of black holes to discover they're girded by electromagnetic winds that not only influence how the super-dense interstellar bodies gobble up anything that gets too close but also how they affect vast areas of space around them. Source
  • Apple CEO Tim Cook visits Canada for the first time

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Apple chief executive Tim Cook is visiting Canada for the first time since taking the reins at the tech giant, stopping in for an unannounced appearance with Toronto students to promote the company's initiative to focus on coding education. Source
  • Apple CEO Tim Cook makes 1st visit to Canada, visits Toronto students

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TORONTO - Apple chief executive Tim Cook is visiting Canada for the first time, stopping in for an unannounced appearance with Toronto students to promote the company's initiative to focus on coding education. Cook, who surprised a class of children taking coding lessons at Apple's Eaton Centre location, says he could feel the creativity and diversity Canada has to offer as soon as he stepped off the plane. Source
  • Tim Cook makes 1st visit to Canada as Apple CEO, visits Toronto students

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TORONTO -- Apple Inc.'s Tim Cook visited Canada for the first time as CEO Monday, surprising students at a downtown Toronto Apple store to highlight the importance of learning to code, and dropping in on a group of developers to thank them for their contributions to the tech giant's app store. Source
  • New 508-million-year-old bristle worm found in B.C.

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TORONTO - A new fossil species of bristle worm has been found at the 508-million-year-old Marble Canyon site in B.C.'s Kootenay National Park. The worm found at the Burgess Shale site is helping scientists better understand analids, which include present-day leeches and earthworms. Source
  • New 508-million-year-old fossil found at B.C.'s Burgess Shale

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TORONTO -- A new fossil species of bristle worm has been found at the 508-million-year-old Marble Canyon site in B.C.'s Kootenay National Park. The worm, found by researchers from the Royal Ontario Museum and the University of Toronto, is called Kootenayscolex barbarensis. Source
  • More than 500 fossils of new ancient worm species found in B.C.

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Roughly 508 million years ago, this bristly worm roamed the waters of what is now British Columbia. Now, the newly identified species of ancient worm is helping researchers unravel an ancient mystery. Meet Kootenayscolex barbarensis, a new species of bristle worm. Source
  • Tesla to install Atlantic Canada 'supercharger' stations for its vehicles

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Tesla Inc. is building fast-charging stations for its electric vehicles in Atlantic Canada, opening up the East Coast to road trippers with the California automaker's high-end plug-in cars. The company has plans to set up dozens of new "supercharger" stations across Canada, including seven in the Maritimes — five in New Brunswick and two in Nova Scotia — by the end of 2018. Source
  • Liberals spending $50M to help students K-12 code

    Tech & Science CBC News
    The Liberal government is following up on a 2017 budget promise to spend $50 million to help children learn to code as soon as they start school. Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains announced the government's new CanCode program, which hopes to train students from kindergarten to Grade 12 on coding and other digital skills, during a stop at Microsoft Canada in Mississauga, Ont. Source
  • Liberals spending $50M to teach K-12 students and their teachers coding

    Tech & Science CBC News
    The Liberal government is following up on a 2017 budget promise to spend $50 million to help children learn to code as soon as they start school. Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains announced the government's new CanCode program, which hopes to train students from kindergarten to Grade 12 on coding and other digital skills, during a stop at Microsoft Canada in Mississauga, Ont. Source