SpaceX launches may resume Dec. 19, 6 months after doomed liftoff

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- SpaceX says it's close to launching rockets again six months after an accident.

Chief executive Elon Musk announced via Twitter on Thursday a rocket test-firing for next Wednesday in Florida.

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A satellite launch for Orbcomm could come three days later -- Dec. 19th.

SpaceX has been stuck on Earth since June, when a broken strut doomed its Falcon rocket during liftoff. The accident left NASA without a viable U.S. supplier for the International Space Station. NASA's other commercial shipper, Orbital ATK, finally made a delivery Wednesday, but had to use another company's rocket.

SpaceX hopes to resume supply runs next month.

In the meantime, SpaceX will try again to land its first-stage booster, possibly back at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Barge landing attempts have failed.



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