Canadian scientists presented with Nobel Prize for physics in Stockholm

STOCKHOLM -- Canadian scientist Arthur McDonald has been formally presented with his Nobel Prize at a ceremony in Stockholm.

McDonald, a retired professor from Queen's University in Kingston, Ont.

See Full Article

, was the co-winner in physics for his work on tiny particles known as neutrinos.

McDonald and Japanese scientist Takaaki Kajita were cited for the discovery of neutrino oscillations and their contributions to experiments showing that neutrinos change identities.

They determined that neutrinos have mass, which fundamentally changed the understanding of the laws of physics.

The prizes in medicine, chemistry, literature and the Nobel Memorial Prize in economic sciences are to be handed out later today.

Earlier, members of the Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet, which helped build democracy in the violence-torn country after the 2011 revolution, collected the Nobel Peace Prize in the Norway's capital on Thursday.

Their award was picked up at a ceremony in Oslo City Hall by members of four organizations, representing unions, industry, trade and human rights.

The quartet is made up of four key groups: The Tunisian General Labor Union; the Tunisian Confederation of Industry, Trade and Handicrafts; the Tunisian Human Rights League; and the Tunisian Order of Lawyers, the country's bar association.

Norwegian Nobel Committee Chairwoman Kaci Kullmann Five cited the group for "its decisive contribution to the building of a pluralistic democracy" following Tunisia's 2011 revolution that overthrew its long-time authoritarian president.

The gold medals and diplomas were picked up by Houcine Abassi, the labour union leader; Mohammed Fadhel Mafoudh, head of the bar association; Abdessatar Ben Moussa, president of the human rights group and Wided Bouchamaoui, the head of the employers' association.

She said the 8 million Swedish kronor ($1.3 million CAD) prize was for the quartet as a whole, not for the four individual organizations.

All four peace prize winners took turns at addressing the gathering in the traditional peace laureates' speech.

According to an English translation of the remarks in Arabic, Abassi expressed their sorrow and anger at the "terrorist acts" that had killed and injured hundreds. This year, two major attacks on tourists in Tunisia killed 22 people at the Bardo Museum in the capital, Tunis, and 38 at a resort near Sousse.

He said their "feeling of euphoria and pride does not obscure the grief sorrow and anger" they feel about recent violent events, including "Sousse, the Bardo Museum, Beirut, Paris, Sharm el-Sheikh and Bamako (with) scenes of barbaric and heinous terrorist acts."

With files from the Associated Press



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Guelph researcher turning 'Back to the Future' fuel into reality

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Professor Animesh Dutta has never seen the movie Back to The Future, but his latest project bears a striking resemblance to the film. The University of Guelph engineer is finding a way to turn food waste into fuel. Source
  • Americans stake out prime viewing spots to see sun go dark

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Americans with telescopes, cameras and protective glasses staked out viewing spots along a narrow corridor from Oregon to South Carolina to watch the moon blot out the midday sun Monday in what promised to be the most observed and photographed eclipse in history. Source
  • Why a few drops of water make whisky taste better

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Ignore the snobs, because most experts agree: a few drops of water enhance the taste of whiskies, from well-rounded blends to peat bombs redolent of smoke, tobacco and leather. The only real question is, why is this true? Source
  • New Jersey shore amusement park recalls eclipse glasses

    Tech & Science CTV News
    POINT PLEASANT BEACH, N.J. -- A New Jersey shore amusement park is warning customers who bought special glasses to watch the solar eclipse to return them. Jenkinson's Boardwalk in Point Pleasant Beach announced on Facebook Sunday that EverythingBranded.com does not recommend using the glasses to view Monday's eclipse. Source
  • Rural Missouri set for influx of eclipse tourists in moment out of the sun

    Tech & Science CTV News
    ST. LOUIS -- Rural Missouri is preparing for its moment in the sun. Check that: Its moment out of the sun. A diagonal 482-kilometre-long, roughly 112-kilometres-wide stretch from St. Joseph to Cape Girardeau will be in the "path of totality" that will offer the best viewing of the total eclipse on Monday, the first in 99 years that will be visible coast-to-coast in the U.S. Source
  • China to relaunch one of the world's fastest bullet trains

    Tech & Science CTV News
    BEIJING -- After cutting back the speed of the Beijing to Shanghai bullet train following a deadly crash, China is set to again make it one of the world's fastest. New generation trains will service the route starting next month, making the 1,250-kilometre (777-mile) journey from the capital to Shanghai in just 4 hours, 30 minutes. Source
  • Canadians throwing viewing events for partial eclipse

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Canadians across the country will be donning special glasses and looking to the sky to take in a partial solar eclipse today. Unlike the U.S., Canada won't see a total solar eclipse, where the moon completely covers the sun, blacking out the sky and turning day into night momentarily. Source
  • Millions prepare to watch rare total solar eclipse

    Tech & Science CBC News
    For a few moments on Monday, millions will experience a rare total eclipse across the continental U.S. and millions more in Canada will get a chance to take in a partial eclipse. CBC News will broadcast a live special, hosted by Hannah Thibedeau, starting at 1 p.m. Source
  • How, when and where to watch Monday's solar eclipse in Canada

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Millions of Canadians will be treated to a rare celestial event on Monday, when the full moon lines up between the sun and Earth. Here’s everything you need to know about where, when and how to safely view the solar eclipse in Canada. Source
  • Right whale found dead off Cape Cod: researchers

    Tech & Science CTV News
    BOSTON -- Researchers at the New England Aquarium in Boston say another North Atlantic right whale has died. The aquarium's right whale research team tweeted that the dead whale was a female named "Couplet. Source