Canadian scientists presented with Nobel Prize for physics in Stockholm

STOCKHOLM -- Canadian scientist Arthur McDonald has been formally presented with his Nobel Prize at a ceremony in Stockholm.

McDonald, a retired professor from Queen's University in Kingston, Ont.

See Full Article

, was the co-winner in physics for his work on tiny particles known as neutrinos.

McDonald and Japanese scientist Takaaki Kajita were cited for the discovery of neutrino oscillations and their contributions to experiments showing that neutrinos change identities.

They determined that neutrinos have mass, which fundamentally changed the understanding of the laws of physics.

The prizes in medicine, chemistry, literature and the Nobel Memorial Prize in economic sciences are to be handed out later today.

Earlier, members of the Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet, which helped build democracy in the violence-torn country after the 2011 revolution, collected the Nobel Peace Prize in the Norway's capital on Thursday.

Their award was picked up at a ceremony in Oslo City Hall by members of four organizations, representing unions, industry, trade and human rights.

The quartet is made up of four key groups: The Tunisian General Labor Union; the Tunisian Confederation of Industry, Trade and Handicrafts; the Tunisian Human Rights League; and the Tunisian Order of Lawyers, the country's bar association.

Norwegian Nobel Committee Chairwoman Kaci Kullmann Five cited the group for "its decisive contribution to the building of a pluralistic democracy" following Tunisia's 2011 revolution that overthrew its long-time authoritarian president.

The gold medals and diplomas were picked up by Houcine Abassi, the labour union leader; Mohammed Fadhel Mafoudh, head of the bar association; Abdessatar Ben Moussa, president of the human rights group and Wided Bouchamaoui, the head of the employers' association.

She said the 8 million Swedish kronor ($1.3 million CAD) prize was for the quartet as a whole, not for the four individual organizations.

All four peace prize winners took turns at addressing the gathering in the traditional peace laureates' speech.

According to an English translation of the remarks in Arabic, Abassi expressed their sorrow and anger at the "terrorist acts" that had killed and injured hundreds. This year, two major attacks on tourists in Tunisia killed 22 people at the Bardo Museum in the capital, Tunis, and 38 at a resort near Sousse.

He said their "feeling of euphoria and pride does not obscure the grief sorrow and anger" they feel about recent violent events, including "Sousse, the Bardo Museum, Beirut, Paris, Sharm el-Sheikh and Bamako (with) scenes of barbaric and heinous terrorist acts."

With files from the Associated Press



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Study: Global warming is shrinking river vital to 40M people

    Tech & Science CTV News
    DENVER -- Global warming is already shrinking the Colorado River, the most important waterway in the American Southwest, and it could reduce the flow by more than a third by the end of the century, two scientists say. Source
  • Large iceberg poised to break off Antarctic ice shelf

    Tech & Science CBC News
    An iceberg that's 80 kilometres long is poised to break off Antarctica. Scientists say the rift has slowly been developing across the Antarctic Peninsula's Larsen C ice shelf for years, but it grew by 18 kilometres in December and now has only 20 kilometres left before it snaps off. Source
  • 'Doomsday' seed vault receives 50,000 new samples

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Nearly 10 years after a "doomsday" seed vault opened on an Arctic island, some 50,000 new samples from seed collections around the world have been deposited in the world's largest repository built to safeguard against wars or natural disasters wiping out global food crops. Source
  • Will astronomers ever be able to confirm life exists on other planets?

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Scientists continue to seek signs of life outside our solar system, but how will they know when they find it? Astronomers announced Wednesday they had found seven Earth-sized planets orbiting a star 39 light-years away. Three of the planets lie within the "habitable zone," a theoretical range in which liquid water could exist. Source
  • Celebrity gamer dies during 24-hour live-stream of 'World of Tanks' play on Twitch

    Tech & Science Toronto Sun
    Twenty-two hours into a 24-hour-long marathon video game session, Twitch streamer Brian Vigneault, 35, got up to take a smoke break. He never returned to his computer. His fans, mainly fellow gamers who watched Vigneault play the online skirmisher World of Tanks, wondered if Vigneault had fallen asleep. Source
  • Lawmakers renew push for drilling in Alaska wildlife refuge

    Tech & Science CTV News
    ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- Former U.S. Sen. Frank Murkowski in 2001 gave a speech urging colleagues to approve oil drilling in America's largest wildlife refuge. The Alaska Republican held up a blank sheet of paper to illustrate his point. Source
  • Arctic 'doomsday' seed vault receives 50,000 new deposits

    Tech & Science CTV News
    HELSINKI -- Nearly 10 years after a "doomsday" seed vault opened on an Arctic island, some 50,000 new samples from seed collections around the world have been deposited in the world's largest repository built to safeguard against wars or natural disasters wiping out global food crops. Source
  • Renowned Canadian-born architect Frank Gehry to teach online architecture course

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TORONTO -- Class will soon be in session for Frank Gehry, and the celebrated Canadian-born architect will be leading the lessons. The California-based Gehry will be teaching what is being billed as his first-ever online class this spring. Source
  • NASA's Juno spacecraft stuck in long orbits around Jupiter

    Tech & Science CBC News
    NASA's Jupiter-circling spacecraft is stuck making long laps around the gas giant because of sticky valves. It currently takes Juno 53 days to fly around the solar system's biggest planet. That's almost four times longer than the intended 14-day orbit. Source
  • Video feed of giraffe birth briefly removed after labelled 'sexually explicit'

    Tech & Science CTV News
    HARPURSVILLE, N.Y. -- The owner of a New York zoo planning to live-stream a giraffe giving birth says the video feed was briefly removed from YouTube because animal rights activists labeled it sexually explicit. Animal Adventure Park started streaming video Wednesday of 15-year-old April in her enclosed pen at the zoo in Harpursville, more than 200 kilometres of New York City. Source