Deadline approaching for Paris climate change strategy

LE BOURGET, France -- Sleep-deprived and increasingly tense, diplomats and climate negotiators outside Paris struggled Thursday to narrow down a 29-page draft of an unprecedented deal to tackle climate change-- but countries remained at odds on critical issues a day before the organizers' deadline for an agreement.

See Full Article

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry reached out to two major developing nations -- Brazil and India -- and is expected to meet other negotiators as the Obama administration works for a deal that reflects its concerns about global warming but doesn't require congressional approval.

Climate negotiations continued until about 5 a.m. Thursday (0400 GMT, 11 p.m. EST Wednesday) before resuming midmorning, and a new draft accord is expected to be released sometime during the day, a French diplomat said. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he wasn't authorized to speak publicly about the negotiations.

The draft released Wednesday left major issues unresolved, including the long-term goal of an eventual accord, and which countries should pay to help the most vulnerable nations cope with global warming.

The French organizers of the two-week talks want a final agreement by Friday night, though U.N. climate conferences rarely end on time.

This time is different from past talks, because the French organizers pushed countries to set their own emissions targets before the Paris conference, and the U.S. and China, who have clashed over climate in the past, bridged key differences earlier this year.

Another thing different this time is the scale of the proposed deal: Ministers from more than 190 countries are trying to craft the first climate accord asking all nations to reduce or slow their emissions. The previous agreement, the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, required only rich countries to do so.

"The outlook is positive, but there is still a lot of work to be done," Elina Bardram, head of the EU climate delegation. The draft is "still too heavy."

Chinese negotiator Gao Feng was one of many suggesting the talks won't finish on time. "Friday or maybe Saturday, I think we will get it."

Kerry was holding talks at the Le Bourget conference site with the environment ministers of Brazil and India, according to the U.S. State Department. Brazil and India are among the biggest nations demanding that richer countries pay and do more to reduce carbon emissions.

One unresolved question for the deal is its long-term goal for fossil fuels -- oil, coal and gas -- that are the source of most man-made emissions and provide most of the world's energy today. Replacing them with renewable sources like wind and solar power requires big investments, which poor countries say they can't afford without help.

The document doesn't settle the sensitive question of whether advanced developing countries such as China and oil-rich Arab nations should join industrialized countries in providing financial aid.

Associated Press writers Seth Borenstein and Karl Ritter contributed to this report.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Climate change contributing to urban 'heat islands' raising costs for cities

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Heat trapped by dark-coloured roads and buildings will more than double cities' costs for tackling global warming this century by driving up energy demand to keep citizens cool and by aggravating pollution, scientists said on Monday. Source
  • Stunning display of northern lights captured by photographers

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Did you see them? You may have been tucked into bed or inside, but on Saturday night and early Sunday morning, the sky erupted in a stunning display of northern lights that many people were able to capture with cameras. Source
  • In Canada, parks thrive but conservationists cry foul

    Tech & Science CTV News
    On a highway in Banff National Park in western Canada, tourists hastily park their cars to catch a glimpse of a bear at the edge of the forest. "We've seen some amazing animal life up here, much more than a lot of other places that we've gone camping," Tony Garland, a 60-something American who drove up from Seattle, told AFP. Source
  • Human-made chemicals found in higher quantities in deep ocean

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Human-made chemicals are penetrating deeper into the North Atlantic, a new study has found. Remember CFCs? Production of the ozone-depleting chemicals was largely phased out globally in 1994. But almost 25 years later, researchers are finding them in increasing amounts in the deeper, "older" parts of the ocean. Source
  • 'O Canada': Researcher mounts microscopic flag on penny to celebrate 150 years

    Tech & Science CBC News
    It's the smallest tribute to Canada that you'll ever see. McMaster University research engineer Travis Casagrande has carved a microscopic, 3D Canadian flag on the face of a penny. The carving — which is one one-hundredth the size of a human hair and invisible to the naked eye — is meant to be a celebration of Canada's 150th birthday this year, and a showcase of the microscopes at the Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy at the university. Source
  • No public memorial for Harambe planned as Cincinnati Zoo looks ahead

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CINCINNATI -- No public events are planned at the Cincinnati Zoo marking the one-year anniversary of the shooting of an endangered gorilla. The zoo's dangerous-animal response team concluded the life of a 3-year-old boy who fell into the gorilla enclosure last May 28 was in danger and killed 17-year-old Harambe. Source
  • If U.S. quits climate deal, Earth expected to warm dangerously

    Tech & Science CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- Earth is likely to reach more dangerous levels of warming even sooner if the U.S. retreats from its pledge to cut carbon dioxide pollution, scientists said. That's because America contributes so much to rising temperatures. Source
  • Mother of Uber CEO Travis Kalanick killed in boat accident

    Tech & Science CTV News
    FRESNO, Calif. -- The mother of the CEO of the ride-hailing company Uber died in a boat accident Friday evening in Fresno County, the company said. Bonnie Kalanick, 71, died after the boat she and her husband, Donald, 78, were riding hit a rock in Pine Flat Lake in the eastern part of the county, authorities said. Source
  • G7 leaders agree to fight protectionism, U.S. still not on board on climate agreement

    Tech & Science CBC News
    U.S. President Donald Trump has agreed to include a pledge to fight trade protectionism in a final communique due to be released later on Saturday at the end of a summit of Group of Seven leaders, a G7 source said. Source
  • Trapped 'like a caged animal': Climate change taking toll on mental health of Inuit

    Tech & Science CBC News
    As millions of Canadians eagerly anticipate the arrival of warm weather, many people living in Canada's North will be lamenting the end of winter. For the Inuit, milder temperatures mean the sea ice is melting, making travel more difficult. Source