'Indiana Jones' cinematographer Douglas Slocombe dies at 103

Douglas Slocombe, the chameleonic British cinematographer who filmed the Nazi invasion of Poland, the adventures of "Indiana Jones" and the madcap farce of Ealing comedies, has died.

See Full Article

Slocombe was 103.

His daughter, Georgina Slocombe, said Slocombe died early Monday in a London hospital. A recent fall led to setbacks that ended with his death, she said.

"He said the other day that he loved every day of his work, every day on the set," said Georgina Slocombe, a photographer. "He really enjoyed his work and his life."

Slocombe was one of British cinema's most acclaimed cinematographers. He shot some 80 films, working with directors as varied as George Cukor, John Huston, Norman Jewison and Roman Polanski. His career began with the famed Ealing black comedies of the late 1940s and early '50s, and ended with three "Indiana Jones" films for Steven Spielberg.

"Dougie Slocombe was facile, enthusiastic, and loved the action of filmmaking," Spielberg said. "Harrison Ford was Indiana Jones in front of the camera, but with his whip-smart crew, Dougie was my behind the scenes hero for the first three Indy movies."

The London-born, France-raised Slocombe was nominated for three Academy Awards and won three from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts for 1974's "The Great Gatsby," 1963's "The Servant" and 1977's "Julia." The British Society of Cinematographers gave him a lifetime achievement award in 1995.

While in his 20s, Slocombe documented Germany's 1939 invasion of Poland as a newsreel cameraman. His footage was used in Herbert Kline's documentary, "Lights Out in Europe."

"I had no understanding of the concept of blitzkrieg. I had been expecting trouble but I thought it would be in trenches, like WWI," he told the BBC in 2014. "The Germans were coming over the border at a great pace."

After the war, he became the house cinematographer for Ealing Studios, lensing many of its classic comedies, including "Kind Hearts and Coronets," "The Man in the White Suit" and "The Lavender Hill Mob" starring Alec Guiness.

Following Ealing's demise, Slocombe signed on to a number of CinemaScope releases, such as "A High Wind in Jamaica" and "Guns at Batasi." Other credits through the '60s and '70s included "The Lion in Winter," "The Italian Job" and "Rollerball."

"A lot of cameramen try to evolve a technique and then apply that to everything," Slocombe once said. "But I suffer from a bad memory and could never remember how I'd done something before, so I could always approach something afresh. I found I was able to change techniques on picture after picture."

Later, Spielberg, for whom Slocombe shot scenes of "Close Encounters of the Third Kind," enlisted him for "Raiders of the Lost Ark," as well as two "Indiana Jones" sequels. His last film was 1989's "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade."



Advertisements

Latest Entertainment News

  • Katie Holmes probes mom-daughter bond in directorial debut, 'All We Had'

    Entertainment CTV News
    LOS ANGELES -- Katie Holmes is a single mom raising a daughter and that's the subject of her feature film directorial debut, "All We Had." The 37-year-old actress stars alongside 18-year-old Stefania Owen in the film about a mother who finds herself living in a car with her daughter and looking for a new start. Source
  • 'Secrets keep you sick. And I don't want to keep this secret anymore,' Lady Gaga says of PTSD struggle

    Entertainment CBC News
    Lady Gaga is opening up further on her struggles with post-traumatic stress disorder in an open letter. The 30-year-old singer revealed her diagnosis earlier this week on the Today show.'Today I shared one my deepest secrets:' Lady Gaga opens up on PTSD struggleIn an open letter posted on her foundation's website Wednesday, Gaga writes that it's "a daily effort" to stay calm during normal everyday activities, including "leaving the house or being touched by strangers who simply want to share…
  • 'Rogue One' moves 'Star Wars' forward by going back

    Entertainment CTV News
    SAN FRANCISCO -- A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away, there were more stories than those of the Skywalker family. That was the idea Disney was counting on when it purchased George Lucas's empire Lucasfilm for $4 billion in 2012, and the rights to everything in the "Star Wars" universe. Source
  • 'Office Christmas Party' review: Jennifer Aniston and Jason Bateman serve up a lump of coal [Video]

    Entertainment Toronto Sun
    You know those office Christmas parties where everyone tries to look like they’re having a good time, but they’re really not? Well, it’s playing at a theatre near you. A comedy-by-committee (it has two directors and multiple credited writers – which means maybe five more had a hand at tossing in jokes), Office Christmas Party takes an embarrassment of riches cast and gives them a script stuffed full of lumps of coal wisecracks. Source
  • Papa was a Rolling Stone: Mick Jagger welcomes birth of 8th child

    Entertainment CBC News
    Mick Jagger's representatives say the rock legend has welcomed the birth of his eighth child. Jagger, the 73-year-old frontman of the Rolling Stones, was on hand Thursday at a New York hospital when girlfriend, Melanie Hamrick, gave birth to the couple's son. Source
  • Papa is a Rolling Stone: Mick Jagger welcomes birth of 8th child

    Entertainment CBC News
    Mick Jagger's representatives say the rock legend has welcomed the birth of his eighth child. Jagger, the 73-year-old frontman of the Rolling Stones, was on hand Thursday at a New York hospital when girlfriend, Melanie Hamrick, gave birth to the couple's son. Source
  • Rolling Stone’s Mick Jagger celebrates birth of 8th child

    Entertainment Toronto Sun
    NEW YORK — Mick Jagger’s representatives say the rock legend has welcomed the birth of his eighth child. Jagger, the 73-year-old frontman of the Rolling Stones, was on hand Thursday at a New York hospital when girlfriend, Melanie Hamrick, gave birth to the couple’s son. Source
  • Canadian 'Grindmother,' 68, singing for hardcore band

    Entertainment CTV News
    The age of destruction is 68. A Canadian grindcore band has captured international attention thanks to its senior citizen vocalist, a 68-year-old woman known as "The Grindmother." The granny from Windsor, Ont., is following in the tradition of bands like Napalm Death, Pig Destroyer and Carcass, as the screaming voice of her eponymous band. Source
  • Grammy country committee rejects Beyonce song

    Entertainment Toronto Sun
    NEW YORK — Beyonce earned a whopping nine Grammy nominations Tuesday, including best rock performance, but the singer’s twangy song “Daddy Lessons” was rejected by the Recording Academy’s country music committee. A person familiar with the Grammy nomination process told The Associated Press on Wednesday that Beyonce submitted “Daddy Lessons” — from her album “Lemonade” — to the country category. Source
  • Netflix and..? Services reveals post-binge habits

    Entertainment CTV News
    Many Netflix users switch to a movie after reaching the end of a TV series, the streaming service has revealed. Netflix states that 59 per cent of Netflix viewers take a three-day break "post-binge" -- that is, after finishing one TV show and before choosing another one. Source