'To Kill a Mockingbird' author Harper Lee laid to rest in Alabama hometown

MONROEVILLE, Ala. -- The author of the America classic "To Kill a Mockingbird" was laid to rest Saturday, in a private ceremony attended by only the closest of friends and family, a reflection of how she had lived.

See Full Article

Harper Lee, who died Friday at age 89, was eulogized at a church in the small Alabama town of Monroeville, which the author used as a model for the imaginary town of Maycomb, the setting of Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel.

A few dozen people who comprised Lee's intimate circle gathered at the First United Methodist Church to hear a eulogy Saturday by her longtime friend and history professor, Wayne Flynt. Afterward, her casket was taken by silver hearse to an adjacent cemetery where her father, A.C. Lee and sister, Alice Lee, are buried.

Flynt, a longtime friend of Lee, said he delivered a eulogy that Lee specifically requested years ago. Entitled, "Atticus inside ourselves," the eulogy was written by Flint for a speech that he gave in 2006 as a tribute to Lee when she won the Birmingham Pledge Foundation Award for racial justice.

Flynt said Lee liked the speech so much that she wanted him to give it as her eulogy.

"I want you to say exactly that," Flynt quoted Lee as saying at the time. "Not one thing more, and not one thing less."

"If I deviated one degree, I would hear this great booming voice from heaven, and it wouldn't be God," Flynt said in an earlier interview.

Details of the service were fiercely guarded. Lee had wanted a quick and quiet funeral without pomp or fanfare, family members said.

"We obeyed her wishes," said Jackie Stovall, Lee's second cousin.

The town was appropriately sombre a day after their native daughter's death.

Ann Mote, owner of the Ol' Curiosities & Book Shoppe in Monroeville, said she thinks the town will always be linked to Lee.

Jared Anton, of Hollywood, Florida, sat outside the old courthouse in Monroeville during part of planned vacation through the South that coincided with Lee's death.

Anton said reading the book -- in which attorney Atticus Finch defends a wrongly accused African-American man -- was one reason he decided became a lawyer.

"It had an impact on me when I was younger. I wanted to do the right thing, to stand up to people, to defend the innocent if you will," Anton said. "It is the greatest American novel. Name one that really has had more of an impact on Americans than that book."

Mockingbirds chirped and frolicked among blooming camellia bushes outside the courthouse on a warm Alabama morning that teased the early arrival of spring.

The courthouse was where Lee as a child, like her creation Scout Finch, would peer down from the balcony as her father tried his cases in the courtroom. The southern town was home to childhood friends Truman Capote and Lee, giving rise to its self-given nickname of the literary capital of the South.

"She's a part of it and always will be," said Mote.

Tributes to Lee's novel dot the town. The courthouse is a museum that pays homage to her creation. There's the Mockingbird Inn on the edge of town and a statute of children reading, "Mockingbird" in the courthouse square.

Tickets for the city's annual "Mockingbird" play go on sale in a week for the city's annual "To Kill A Mockingbird" play, Mote said. A black mourning bow donned the top of the sign at the bookstore, where a stack of hardcopy "Mockingbird" books sat the counter along with a DVD of the movie.

The town this summer had a celebration for the release of "Go Set a Watchman" -- Lee's initial draft of the story that would become "Mockingbird" -- even though many residents had ambivalent feelings about its release.

Lee was largely unseen in her hometown in recent years, as she first sought privacy and then was secluded at an assisted living home. Security guards would shoo away the inevitable mix of reporters, curious onlookers and old acquaintances who were not on her list of approved visitors.

"You would see her around, but still we would honour her wishes of being a very private person. The impact from now forward, I think for the next few weeks we'll have an influx of people in here just looking around and at some point -- like when anybody passes away -- at some point it just returns back to normal," said Tim McKenzie, chairman of the museum's board of directors who also acts in the play.

McKenzie said the best way fans can honour the author's memory is by applying the values in Mockingbird to the way they treat others.

"That story, I'm glad it's in just about all the schools now because it's a story that everybody needs to hear," he said. "If you adhere to the values she put in that book, if everybody did, we'd be living in a much better world."



Advertisements

Latest Entertainment News

  • Don Rickles interview series debuts online

    Entertainment Toronto Sun
    NEW YORK — A digital series starring late comedy legend Don Rickles will debut online Monday. The 13-episode show “Dinner with Don ,” produced by AARP Studios, features Rickles interviewing celebrities such as Jimmy Kimmel, Snoop Dogg , Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese at his favourite restaurants in Hollywood. Source
  • Jeffrey Dean Morgan accidentally reveals he and wife Hilarie Burton are expecting a baby girl

    Entertainment Toronto Sun
    Jeffrey Dean Morgan was left red-faced after accidentally revealing that he and wife Hilarie Burton are expecting a daughter at the Supernatural convention in New Jersey on Sunday. The 51-year-old actor was just one of the castmembers of the hit U.S. Source
  • Heidi Klum, boyfriend take a break from relationship

    Entertainment Toronto Sun
    Heidi Klum is pressing pause on her relationship with boyfriend Vito Schnabel. The German supermodel has been dating the art dealer since early 2014, with the pair often spotted out and about together in New York City. Source
  • Rick Mercer to end 'Mercer Report' after 15 seasons

    Entertainment Toronto Sun
    TORONTO — When the “Rick Mercer Report” returns to CBC Tuesday night, the opening headline will be “Final Season.” The Canadian comedian has decided to end the show in March after 15 seasons and 277 episodes. In an interview with The Canadian Press, Mercer said there was no “seismic event or epiphany that this should be the end. Source
  • 'If I want to get down on my knees... that's what that flag is for:' Pharrell Williams in Charlottesville

    Entertainment CBC News
    Thousands of people packed a stadium in Charlottesville Sunday for a concert intended to raise money for charity and promote unity in the aftermath of this summer's white nationalist rallies. Dave Matthews, whose band got its start in the Virginia college town, hosted A Concert For Charlottesville: An Evening Of Music And Unity. Source
  • James Corden returns to host Hollywood Film Awards

    Entertainment CTV News
    LOS ANGELES -- James Corden will return as host of the Hollywood Film Awards later this year. Dick Clark Productions, which produces the awards, made the announcement in a press release Monday. This is the third straight year that the "Late Late Show" host has helmed the ceremony, scheduled to take place Sunday, Nov. Source
  • ‘Why shouldn’t I be the one to do it?’: Lights unveils new Skin & Earth LP and comic book series

    Entertainment Toronto Sun
    Canadian electro-pop singer-songwriter Lights may have lightened up her normally brown hair to a “vibrant red,” but she’s gone dark on her latest album, Skin & Earth, and the accompanying comic book series. “It’s a whole different look and that was inspired by the comic,” she says. Source
  • Rick Mercer will say goodbye to 'best job in the world' after 15th season

    Entertainment CBC News
    After more than a decade, Rick Mercer says it's time to close the curtain on his show. The Rick Mercer Report will launch its 15th and final season Tuesday on CBC-TV. "It's still the best job in the world. Source
  • Justin Timberlake declares love for Tenn at home state set

    Entertainment CTV News
    FRANKLIN, Tenn. -- Memphis native Justin Timberlake returned to his home state for one of his few performances this year to declare his love for Tennessee. Timberlake performed on Saturday in Franklin, Tennessee, at the Pilgrimage Festival, a 3-year-old music festival that he now co-produces and is conveniently close to his current home in Middle Tennessee. Source
  • Luke Bryan joins 'American Idol': Report

    Entertainment Toronto Sun
    Country singer Luke Bryan has reportedly signed on to join Katy Perry as the second judge on the American Idol reboot. The That’s My Kind of Night hitmaker received an offer to join the U.S. TV competition show earlier this month and, according to Deadline, he has now signed on. Source