Review: 'The Witch' an unconventional, bewitching horror film


"The Witch" is the kind of horror film that is not content to simply say "Boo!" There are few, if any, jump scares in the film.

See Full Article

Instead, it’s the kind of puritanical folk tale that slowly burrows itself into your brain, leaving you queasy and uneasy.

Set in New England, 1630 the movie centers on Christian settlers William, Katherine (Ralph Ineson and Kate Dickie, both of "Game of Thrones") and their five children, a family banished from their church and community to seek out a life on the outskirts of town.

Bordered by an ominous forest, their remote new home offers little in the way of comfort, spiritual uplift or sustenance.

Plagued by grinding poverty and crop failure, the devote family is rocked when their baby son is stolen while under the care of eldest daughter Thomasin (Anya Taylor-Joy). The disappearance is chalked up to something satanic—perhaps a witch from the woods—and a pall of distrust and fear envelops the family, tearing away at the very core of their lives—their faith.

The Witch film review

"The Witch" is a slow burn (in hell). Screenwriter and first time director Robert Eggers takes his time building up to a bewitchingly strange climax, toggling between paranoia and illusory (or are they?) elements to allow the dread to mount.

He creates a compact but complete and complex world for his characters to inhabit, chock-a-block with interesting details. Much of the dialogue was borrowed from contemporary trial transcripts and journals and comes heavily laden with religious fervour and the wilderness provides a gloomy backdrop, providing with creepy sounds and the possibility of evil. Everything, every creaking tree branch, every image seems to take on meaning as the hysteria increases.

As William, Ineson is a stern, austere man ruled by his religion, even if it means denying his daughter. The real revelation here is Anya Taylor-Joy as the put-upon daughter whose tests the family’s ideas of faith, loyalty and love.

The Witch film review

"The Witch" won’t be for everyone, and certainly not for casual horror fans. There’s no Freddys or Jasons in sight, just pure terror.


Latest Entertainment News

  • SNL pokes fun at Canada with harassment sketch where everyone says 'sorry'

    Entertainment CTV News
    Saturday Night Live poked fun at Canadians this week with a sketch about a harassment scandal where everyone, including Montreal band Arcade Fire, says they're sorry. In addition to the musical guest, the sketch featured former SNL cast member Bill Hader, who played a fictional movie producer accused of being the "Canadian Harvey Weinstein. Source
  • 'Black Panther' tops box office for 5th straight weekend

    Entertainment CTV News
    NEW YORK -- Not since "Avatar" has a box-office hit had the kind of staying power of "Black Panther." Ryan Coogler's comic-book sensation on Sunday became the first film since James Cameron's 2009 smash to top the weekend box office five straight weekends. Source
  • Canadian standup comedian Mike MacDonald dies from heart complications

    Entertainment CTV News
    Mike MacDonald, a pioneer of the Canadian standup comedy scene, has died. The longtime comedian died on Saturday afternoon from heart complications at the Ottawa Heart Institute, his brother J.P. MacDonald said on Sunday. Source
  • Four shows to fill this year's 'Game of Thrones' void

    Entertainment CTV News
    While HBO executives teased the demise of multiple main characters in the final season of "Game of Thrones," and reports emerged of cast members tearing up while reading the scripts, the eighth season won't actually be hitting the small screen until April 2019. Source
  • 'Canadian Harvey Weinstein,' Arcade Fire, all 'sorry' in SNL sketch

    Entertainment CBC News
    Members of Montreal rock group Arcade Fire appeared in a Saturday Night Live sketch — all squeezing out a Canadian "sorry" as a nod to the #MeToo movement. They took turns apologizing for briefly working for a fictional movie producer dubbed the "Canadian Harvey Weinstein," in the skit that poked gentle fun at the Canadian talent for apologizing. Source
  • 'I'll always stand behind Hedley': Fan makes 1,500 paper hearts to show support

    Entertainment CTV News
    As Toronto police investigate Hedley frontman Jacob Hoggard amid sexual misconduct allegations, a long-time fan helped make 1,500 paper hearts to hand out at a Winnipeg concert in support of the band. “A lot of people can’t live without their music,” Jen Laszchuk told CTV Winnipeg ahead of the Saturday show. Source
  • Barbra Streisand says she's 'never' had #MeToo moment

    Entertainment CBC News
    Barbra Streisand said she's never suffered sexual harassment but has felt abused by the media. During a tribute to Streisand's decades of TV music specials and other programs, producer and long-time admirer Ryan Murphy queried her about her career, the #MeToo movement and her aversion to interviews. Source
  • Barbra Streisand says no #MeToo moment marred her life

    Entertainment CTV News
    LOS ANGELES -- Barbra Streisand says she's never suffered sexual harassment in her long career. Streisand made the comment when she was asked about the #MeToo movement during a tribute to her Saturday in Los Angeles. Source
  • Demi Lovato celebrates 6 years sober at show with DJ Khaled

    Entertainment CTV News
    NEW YORK -- Demi Lovato celebrated six years of sobriety at a concert in New York with tour mate DJ Khaled, whose powerful words brought the pop star to tears. Lovato performed Friday night at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, telling the audience that March 15 was a proud day for her. Source
  • Demi Lovato celebrates 6 years of sobriety at concert

    Entertainment CBC News
    Demi Lovato celebrated six years of sobriety at a concert in New York with tour mate DJ Khaled, whose words brought the pop star to tears. Lovato performed Friday night at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, telling the audience that March 15 was a proud day for her. Source