'Deadpool' review: This may be the role Ryan Reynolds has been waiting for

Don’t expect the usual kid-friendly superhero fare from “Deadpool.” He’s part of the Marvel family, a distant cousin to Iron Man, The Hulk and Captain America, but he's a superantihero, a weaponized bad attitude come-to-life with a chip on his shoulder and a raunchy quip on his lips.

See Full Article

Ryan Reynolds plays Wade Wilson, a former Special Services operative who now spends his days as the "Patron Saint of the Pitiful," a mercenary who takes care of life's little problems for people who can't take care of themselves. "I'm a bad guy who get paid to BLEEP worse guys," he says. When he meets Vanessa Carlysle (Morena Baccarin) he finally feels like he has a shot at a normal -- or at least normalish -- life.

They're a match made in heaven. "Ever had a cigarette put out on your skin?" she coos. "Where else do you put them out," he says. In love, they have plans to get married until he is diagnosed with late stage liver, prostate and brain cancer. Grasping at straws he signs up for an experimental treatment that promises to cure his disease. Instead, he is subjected to round-the-clock torture by an evil doctor named Francis (Ed Skrein), who uses immense physical stress to trigger super power mutations in his patients.

The treatment leaves him disfigured, both physically -- "You look like an avocado had sex with an older avocado," says his best friend -- and mentally -- the treatment "cell stomped my sanity," he says -- but with accelerated healing powers and a sarcastic way with a word that earns him the nickname The Merc (mercenary) with the Mouth.

Estranged from Vanessa, who thinks he's dead, he searches for Frances, the only person who can right the wrongs done to him and give him back his life. Decked out in red leather suit that resembles a Spider-Man ninja costume -- Why is it red? "So bad guys can't see me bleed."--he adopts the alter ego Deadpool.

Review for Deadpool

"Deadpool" is unlike any other origin story. It's a snarky, violent, fourth-wall-breaking collision between "Van Wilder" and Marvel Comics. The opening credits -- which scream the movie stars God's Perfect Idiot, A Hot Girl, A British Villain, A CGI Character and features a Gratuitous Cameo -- set the tone. This isn't your grandfather's superhero movie. With one bloody shot across the bow "Deadpool" makes the other Marvel movies look a little less Marvel-ous. No joke is too crass. No lines are left uncrossed. Where the last couple of Marvel superhero films have felt like odes to market research, "Deadpool" feels like an antidote to the repetition of recent superhero offerings. Politically incorrect and rowdy, it's a down-and-dirty movie that has more in common with "The Toxic Avenger" than "Iron Man."

Ryan Reynolds plays Wade Wilson

This may be the role Reynolds has been waiting for. It mixes-and-matches his skill at dropping a one liner with his physical side and finally gives his bland leading man mien some edge. Self-effacing, he pokes fun at his other attempts at superhero notoriety. "Please don't make this super suit green or animated," says the former Green Lantern and suddenly we forgive his past transgressions.

"Deadpool" won't be for everyone. It's occasionally a little too rude and crude, bloody and bowed for it's own good but at least it tries to do something a little different in the well-worn context of the superhero genre. It exists in a meta universe where Deadpool is aware he's in a movie -- "Whose BLEEP did I have to BLEEP to get my own movie?" he asks -- while another character suggests that the name Deadpool "sounds like a franchise." I hope so. Like them or not, superhero movies aren't going anywhere soon but at least every now and again there may be a new "Deadpool" film to shake things up a bit.


Latest Entertainment News

  • The Crown producers apologize after Claire Foy, Matt Smith pay disparity uproar

    Entertainment CBC News
    Producers of the Netflix drama The Crown apologized Tuesday to actors Claire Foy and Matt Smith over the revelation that Foy was paid less than her male co-star. A producer disclosed last week that Foy — who starred in the first two seasons as Queen Elizabeth II — was paid less than Smith — who played Prince Philip — because Smith was better known. Source
  • 'This is the year of the female' filmmaker says as Hot Docs achieves gender parity

    Entertainment CTV News
    TORONTO -- The topic of female empowerment that's been dominating headlines with the .MeToo movement is also being heavily reflected at this year's Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival. In announcing the lineup for the 25th edition of the Toronto festival on Tuesday, organizers said they've achieved gender parity for the first time, with 50 per cent of the films coming from female directors and many projects with themes relating to women rising up. Source
  • 'It's not all loss. It's not all disintegration:' Frederica von Stade sings of Alzheimer's in new opera

    Entertainment CBC News
    Frederica von Stade is taking on another challenging late-career role, singing in the world premiere of an opera about two women afflicted by Alzheimer's disease. Opera Philadelphia announced Tuesday it will present Sky on Swings, composed by Lembit Beecher with a libretto by Canadian playwright Hannah Moscovitch, to open its 2018-19 season on Sept. Source
  • Subway delays make Cynthia Nixon late to first political event

    Entertainment CTV News
    New York gubernatorial candidate Cynthia Nixon says one of the reasons she's running in the Democratic primary against Gov. Andrew Cuomo is because of the poor condition of New York City's subway system. She experienced that firsthand on Tuesday as she was on her way to her first official campaign event in Brooklyn after announcing her candidacy the day before. Source
  • Cynthia Nixon takes aim at Cuomo in first campaign event

    Entertainment CTV News
    NEW YORK -- Newly announced New York gubernatorial candidate Cynthia Nixon on Tuesday criticized Gov. Andrew Cuomo, her Democratic primary opponent, for favouring corporations and the rich over average New Yorkers. The liberal activist and "Sex and the City" actress took aim at Cuomo in her first official campaign appearance, telling the audience at the Bethesda Healing Center in Brooklyn that she had just made it to the event "in the nick of time" because of subway delays that she blamed on…
  • 'Black Panther' is most tweeted about movie ever: Twitter

    Entertainment CTV News
    NEW YORK - The pop culture sensation "Black Panther" has set another record: most tweeted about movie ever. Twitter said Tuesday that Ryan Coogler's box-office smash has been tweeted about more than 35 million times. Source
  • 'The Crown' producers say sorry to stars after pay row

    Entertainment CTV News
    LONDON - Producers of the Netflix drama "The Crown" have apologized to actors Claire Foy and Matt Smith over the revelation that Foy was paid less than her male co-star. A producer disclosed last week that Foy, who starred as Queen Elizabeth II, was paid less than Smith, who played Prince Philip. Source
  • Virtue, Moir tell Ellen DeGeneres they're 'definitely' not a couple

    Entertainment CBC News
    Not even Ellen DeGeneres could get Canadian ice dance sensations Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir to say they are more than friends. Virtue and Moir appeared on The Ellen DeGeneres Show Tuesday, and the popular host asked them point-blank what a lot of skating fans have been wondering — "Are you a couple?" Source
  • 'As outstanding and outspoken as ever:' Hot Docs unveils 25th anniversary lineup

    Entertainment CBC News
    Hot Docs will showcase "formidable filmmakers" — with 50 per cent of the program comprising work by female filmmakers — as the international documentary festival celebrates its 25th anniversary this spring. Organizers unveiled on Tuesday the complete list of films slated for its upcoming edition, which takes place April 26 to May 6 in Toronto. Source
  • Ringo Starr knighted 50 years after first receiving MBE

    Entertainment CTV News
    LONDON - Call him Sir Ringo now, or Sir Richard to be more precise. Either way, it's a fitting honour for the former Beatles drummer, who has waited decades for the recognition. The 77-year-old Ringo Starr received his long-awaited knighthood from Prince William Tuesday. Source