James Patterson announces gifts to booksellers, libraries

NEW YORK -- The beneficiaries include a manager at the Brazos Bookstore in Houston with a passion for works in translation and a community school in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, dedicated to reaching as many readers as possible.

See Full Article

They are part of James Patterson's US$2 million holiday gift program, with grants and bonuses ranging from $1,000 to $10,000 to schools and libraries and independent bookstores and coordinated with the Scholastic Reading Club and the trade group the American Booksellers Association. Patterson announced Tuesday that 340 libraries and 87 independent bookstore employees had received money.

"Once again, we are enormously grateful for James Patterson's wonderful generosity," Oren Teicher, CEO of the booksellers association, said in a statement to The Associated Press. "Nobody puts their money where their mouth is more than Jim. Providing extra financial support to individuals who spend their entire day putting books into the hands of customers and spreading the joy of reading is an extraordinary gesture."

Over the past few years, the best-selling author has proved as prolific at philanthropy as he had been at turning out novels. Patterson, who routinely publishes multiple works in a given year, has launched initiatives ranging from library aid and book donations to his own children's book imprint at Little, Brown and Co. In November, Patterson was given an honorary National Book Award for his contributions to the literary community.

"I'm just trying to draw attention to books, and draw attention to bookstores and to libraries," Patterson told the AP in a recent phone interview. "The amount of attention given to movies is astounding and to some extent books and bookstores and libraries need to compete."

In a statement, Patterson said the grants and bonuses are his "humble acknowledgment of some of the terrific work taking place in libraries and bookstores."

"Here's to communities supporting their bookstores and libraries. Here's to a country that makes reading a priority. Here's to flourishing libraries and booksellers, and to a joyful holiday season!" the statement said.

Patterson looked through thousands of applications, with those he approved including a $6,000 grant to Pittsfield's Conte Community School, which promised to "spend every penny on brand new, sparkling books," ignoring "no genre, no reading level, no section of the library." Another submission came from an employee at the Brazos store in Houston, urging a bonus for store manager Mark Haber.

"His excitement for books in translation is so well-known around the store," the application reads, that "it's only halfway a store in-joke that his enthusiasm has created a 'Cult of Mark' (or sometimes 'Haberclique'), because there's a steady group of regulars who will essentially buy anything" that Haber recommends.

Haber's reward: a $5,000 bonus.

"I can only say that I love books and live for literature," Haber wrote in an email to the AP. "Introducing great works to readers is a joy and a privilege. In Houston, at Brazos Bookstore, you'd never know there was an Amazon.com or a decline in reading traditional books. Books are alive and well in this city."



Advertisements

Latest Entertainment News

  • Syria's White Helmets members to attend Academy Awards

    Entertainment CBC News
    Two members of Syria's White Helmets humanitarian organization, which is the subject of an Academy Award-nominated film, are set to attend the Oscars Feb. 26 in Los Angeles. The head of the group, Raed Saleh, and the cinematographer behind the short film, Khaled Khatib, have received U.S. Source
  • Tom Holland burnt 'Avengers: Infinity War' script to prevent leaks

    Entertainment Toronto Sun
    Tom Holland has set fire to his Avengers: Infinity War script in an effort to stop movie spoilers from leaking. The 20-year-old British actor confessed he had forgotten to hand in his script to Marvel producers following a recent shoot, so instead took a more extreme approach to making sure no secrets from the script were stolen. Source
  • Rosie O'Donnell will not play Steve Bannon on SNL

    Entertainment Toronto Sun
    Rosie O’Donnell has confirmed she will not appear as Steve Bannon on Saturday Night Live. The 54-year-old offered her services to impersonate U.S President Donald Trump’s chief strategist following Melissa McCarthy’s recent stint as White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer on the comedy sketch show. Source
  • 'Lego Batman' stays No. 1, conquers 'The Great Wall'

    Entertainment CTV News
    NEW YORK -- "The Lego Batman Movie" commanded the Presidents Day weekend box office, staying No. 1 for the second straight week, while the China-focused "The Great Wall" failed to show much muscle in North America. Source
  • Brian Mulroney sings for Donald Trump

    Entertainment CBC News
    Former Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, attending a fundraising gala with Donald Trump, was called to the stage Saturday night to sing a tune he performed alongside another U.S. president more than 30 years ago. Music producer David Foster said Mulroney could sing either Danny Boy or When Irish Eyes Are Smiling, and the man who was prime minister from 1984 to 1993 chose the latter, which he, Ronald Reagan and others sang in 1985 at what became known as the Shamrock Summit in Quebec…
  • James Brown's 'Funky Drummer' Clyde Stubblefield dead at 73

    Entertainment CBC News
    Clyde Stubblefield, a drummer for James Brown who created one of the most widely sampled drum breaks ever, died Saturday. He was 73. His wife, Jody Hannon, told The Associated Press that Stubblefield died of kidney failure at a Madison, Wisconsin, hospital around noon. Source
  • Remembering Stuart: What everyday act of an ordinary person in your community do you think should be honoured?

    Entertainment CBC News
    Sunday on Cross Country Checkup: remembering Stuart Long-time radio storyteller and journalist, Stuart McLean died on Wednesday after a long battle with melanoma cancer. McLean welcomed listeners every Sunday into the world of The Vinyl Cafe, a radio program of essays, short stories and music, with his magnanimous voice and his keen ability to connect with strangers. Source
  • Shia LaBeouf takes anti-Trump performance to New Mexico

    Entertainment CTV News
    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - Actor Shia LaBeouf has brought a performance-art piece against President Donald Trump to New Mexico's largest city. The Albuquerque Journal reports that LaBeouf, along with two other artists, brought on Saturday a 24-hour live-streaming camera mounted to a wall with the message in block letters: "He will not divide us," referring to Trump. Source
  • ‘Big Little Lies’, ‘The Good Fight’ and the final season of ‘Bates Motel’ tops this week’s TV must-sees

    Entertainment Toronto Sun
    Bill Harris' TV must-sees for the week of Feb. 19 1. Big Little Lies Debut In an affluent community, a suspicious death at an elementary school fundraiser (could it be anything other than suspicious in that venue?) draws attention to the friction between some of the mothers. Source
  • Anna Paquin busts TV stereotypes as Bellevue's flawed female lead

    Entertainment CBC News
    A female lead unlike what we typically see onscreen is what drew Anna Paquin to star in CBC's new crime drama Bellevue. "Annie is kind of everything that you don't normally get to see in female characters in mainstream TV or films," said Paquin, who leads the eerie new series as police detective Annie Ryder — a single mom who's a bit of a misfit in her community because of a strange and troubled past. Source